Prajadhipok


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Prajadhipok

(prəchä`tĭpôk) or

Rama VII

(rä` mä), 1893–1941, king of Siam (1925–35). He was educated in England and France. He succeeded his brother Rama VI, and in 1932 a coup forced him to grant a constitution, which allowed for national suffrage and a representative parliament. In 1933 he dismissed the cabinet as too radical. A second rebellion further weakened his already faltering position. Differences over the limits subsequently placed on the royal prerogative led to his abdication in 1935. He moved to England, where he died. He was succeeded by his nephew, Ananda.
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27) Prajadhipok, whom Pratt characterised as `a born ruler of men; an idealist; a prophet; a maker of history and a priest', granted an urgent audience and startled his guest by first shaking hands and then dismissing all royal attendants before engaging in polite and informal conversation.
One of the ancient surviving civilizations, Thailand or Siam as it was known before has been through centuries of monarchical rule until 1932 when King Prajadhipok signed the "Draft Constitution" to create a People's Assembly ushering in a new era of democratic-cum-authoritarian rule followed by a series of military dictatorships, with the king as the titular head and the military as the most powerful institution.
He argues that the writings of royalists that appeared after the revolution represented a concerted effort to construct a narrative that painted King Prajadhipok as a liberal monarch who intended, in due time, to grant his subjects a democratic constitution.
Questioning the historical myth of King Prajadhipok (the kingdom's last absolute monarch) as the 'founding father' of Thai democracy, Federico Ferrara reviews contemporary documents and existing historiography to provide a detailed account of the king's conduct between the coup d'etat of 1932 and his abdication three years later.
In addition, Robert Dahl gave presentations on campaign finance and recall elections at a conference in Pattaya, hosted by the King Prajadhipok Institute (KPI).
The starting point for the current political conundrum is 24 June 1932--the Siamese Revolution, which was supposed to ensure constitutional power for the people in accordance with the aspirations of King Prajadhipok (or Rama VII) (Chaiyan 1994).
King Prajadhipok had also appeared to gradually reassert his influence over the political process.
2, Center for the Study of Thai Politics and Democracy, King Prajadhipok Institute, Nonthaburi, Thailand, 2002.
In 1930 Khun Phan was commissioned as a sub-lieutenant, and in the twilight of the absolute monarchy he received the noble title of khun from King Prajadhipok in 1931 while he was still in his early thirties,w The longer he lived, and he lived until 2006, the rarer was his possession of that honour as those of his generation who had received it passed away.
Then in the following chapter, Prajadhipok is presented as fighting tooth and nail to hang on to his throne from 1932 to 1935.
5) This fact is confirmed by an interview with former King Prajadhipok, who attested that Thailand's obsession with the lost territories was not a product of Japanese influence, but that it had been a perpetual concern of the Chakri monarchs.
She first looks at the struggle for power between Prajadhipok and the People's Party regime, which stripped him of his power in 1932 and eventually drove him to abdicate in 1935.