Prajadhipok


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Prajadhipok

(prəchä`tĭpôk) or

Rama VII

(rä` mä), 1893–1941, king of Siam (1925–35). He was educated in England and France. He succeeded his brother Rama VI, and in 1932 a coup forced him to grant a constitution, which allowed for national suffrage and a representative parliament. In 1933 he dismissed the cabinet as too radical. A second rebellion further weakened his already faltering position. Differences over the limits subsequently placed on the royal prerogative led to his abdication in 1935. He moved to England, where he died. He was succeeded by his nephew, Ananda.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Since 2000, he has been associated with the King Prajadhipok's Institute in studies of democracy in Thailand, and he is a member of the Asian Barometer Project.
An indication of how Pratt manipulated connections to serve his business interests, his visit was preceded by a letter to Siam's King Prajadhipok from A.
Succeeding his brother in 1925, Prajadhipok, who had been educated at Eton and at the Woolwich Military Academy, was unable to cope with growing financial and economic problems or, despite attempts to liberalise government, to appease the opposition.
To quote Lady Maclean again, the king in 1932, Prajadhipok, even though he had accepted the new constitutional monarchy, had lost the will not to live but to reign, and abdicated in favour of his schoolboy nephew, Ananda, the eldest son of his brother Mahidol who died young, leaving his wife to bring up three children, little knowing their destiny.
In the 1930s he also became tutor to the son of King Prajadhipok of Siam (now Thailand) and afterward taught at several U.S.
In Chiang Mai, for instance, the branding of elephants as a symbol both of the monarchy and of the Northern city dates from the 1920s when a troupe of pachyderms carried King Prajadhipok and his queen from the railway station to the city proper during their official visit in 1926.
One of the ancient surviving civilizations, Thailand or Siam as it was known before has been through centuries of monarchical rule until 1932 when King Prajadhipok signed the "Draft Constitution" to create a People's Assembly ushering in a new era of democratic-cum-authoritarian rule followed by a series of military dictatorships, with the king as the titular head and the military as the most powerful institution.
Later, with the support of the Bangkok-based King Prajadhipok Institute, the group developed training workshops and manuals, introducing locals to methods of setting up and running community radio stations.
(8) See for example, Nithi Ieowsriwong, "Thai Political Culture" [in Thai], paper delivered to the 9th Annual Congress of King Prajadhipok's Institute, Bangkok, 8-10 November 2007.
In addition, Robert Dahl gave presentations on campaign finance and recall elections at a conference in Pattaya, hosted by the King Prajadhipok Institute (KPI).
Nelson, ed., Thailand's New Politics: KPI Yearbook 2001 (Nonthaburi: King Prajadhipok's Institute and White Lotus Press, 2002), pp.
Prajak does so by exposing the myth that democracy was a gift from King Prajadhipok to the Thai people that the People's Party squandered, thereby forcing his exile and eventual abdication.