prajna


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prajna

(Sanskrit) “wisdom,” used in abstract sense or some-times personified as a goddess. [Sanskrit: Parrinder, 222]
References in periodicals archive ?
yada tu sarvadikkaladivividisa nivartita syat sarvopadhinirakaranadvarena tada saindhava-ghanavad ekarasam prajnanaghanam anantaram abahyam satyasya satyam aham brahmasmiti sarvato nivartate vividisatmany evavasthita prajna bhavati (cf.
Postoperative visual Acuity at 6 weeks in our study was 6/18-6/6 in 34.0 %, <6/18-6/60 in 54.0%, <6/60-3/60 in 8.0% and <3/60-HM in 4.0%, in Prajna N et al.
In the study by Venkatesh Prajna 59% of patients had visual outcome 6/18 or better.
Prajna NV et al [14] found that predictors for worse 3-month visual acuity include older age (p=0.024), worse presentation visual acuity (p<0.001), larger infiltrate size at presentation (p<0.001), and pigmented ulcer (p=0.030).
If the relationship between sila and prajna is, as we have seen, that "the two fuse in the transformation of the entire personality in the existential realization of selflessness," then it would be possible to argue that seemingly inappropriate acts of various American Buddhist teachers are really a manifestation of karuna, applied through the vehicle of a perfectly subtle but absolutely reasonable use of upaya.
MD *, ([dagger]); Lalitha, Prajna MD4; Srinivasan, Muthiah MDt; Prajna, N.
For the concern with this final bodhisattva 'perfection' (of wisdom, prajna) surely indicates that some bodhisattvas were interested in achieving this, which in turn implies that some bodhisattvas wished to realize complete awakening (samyak-sambodhi) in the here and now.
(1.) Fungal keratitis- N Venkatesh Prajna, Lalitha Prajna, C Veerajayalakshmi; Recent advances in Ophthalmology Vol.
It is by virtue of such lack of inherent existence that potentially not-yet-determined apprehensions of "Buddhist" prajna (or the wisdom that perceives such emptiness) also have their ontological matrix for appearance in the phenomenal realm.
(1.) Lalitha P, Rajagopalan J, Prakash K, Ramaswamy K, Prajna N, Srinivasan M.
Giving (dana), morality or ethical conduct (sila), forbearance/patience (ksanti), striving/effort (virya), meditation (dhyana), insight/wisdom (prajna), skillful means (upaya), vow/commitment (pranidhana), powers (bala), and knowledge (jnana); each of these perfections are important precisely because they are needed in our contemporary world.
(5.) Venkatesh R, Muralikrishnan R, Balent L C, Prakash S K, Prajna N V, Outcomes of high volume cataract surgeries in a developing country, British Journal of Ophthalmology, 2005; 89:1079-1083.