Pravezh

Pravezh

 

in Russian feudal law, the extraction of debts or taxes by daily public flogging with rods, done in execution of a court decision. The Law Code of 1649 established the length of punishment at one month for each 100 rubles due. In case of nonpayment after execution of the sentence, the debtor’s property was transferred to the creditor. When the amount of property was insufficient, the debtor was handed over to the creditor to work off his debt. Indebted landowners often handed over their peasants for flogging. Like many other types of punishment provided for by the Law Code of 1649, pravezh was also intended as a deterrent.

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As winter approached, reports detailing excuses for low yields or tardy returns became more common, and threats of pravezh or of fines would compel the governors and the local peasants to press on with their collections.
Sophia Cathedral, the disgrace of Archbishop Pimen, whom Ivan insulted as a traitor and a wolf, and the extortion via "righter" (pravezh) of much money by oprichniki.
(49) Villagers who had no ready money for payments asked clerks not to subject them to bastinado (pravezh) and would house and feed them for several days while they waited for the money to be raised.