Precombustion Chamber

precombustion chamber

[¦prē·kəm¦bəs·chən ‚chām·bər]
(mechanical engineering)
A small chamber before the main combustion space of a turbine or reciprocating engine in which combustion is initiated.

Precombustion Chamber

 

a cavity in a cylinder head of an internal combustion engine that is connected to the space above a piston (the combustion chamber) by one or more channels. The fuel enters and is partially burned in the precombustion chamber, which improves carburetion by regulating gas flows to the combustion chamber. The volume of a precombustion chamber is generally from 25 to 30 percent of the volume of the main combustion chamber.

References in periodicals archive ?
Cameron says the world-class screw-in precombustion chamber is more rugged than a 14-mm automotive plug and offers a longer service life with greater corrosion resistance.
In entrained coal combustion technology, pulverized coal is injected into a precombustion chamber where it is mixed with swirling air and partially burned.
Plant emissions are very low because of the modern natural gas reciprocating engine technology utilizing precombustion chambers, individual cylinder temperature control, and lean burn technology, CO and VOCs are further controlled with act oxidation catalyst.