prefrontal

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prefrontal

[prē′frənt·əl]
(anatomy)
Situated in the anterior part of the frontal lobe of the brain.
(vertebrate zoology)
Of or pertaining to a bone of some vertebrate skulls, located anterior and lateral to the frontal bone.
Of, pertaining to, or being a scale or plate in front of the frontal scale on the head of some reptiles and fishes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Post-mortem studies have revealed that the inhibitory neurons (which use GABA) in the hippocampi of these individuals are compromised, possibly making it harder for the prefrontal cortex to regulate activity in this structure.
In this study, the between-group difference of the GABA concentration in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex between the schizophrenia group and comparison group neared statistical significance.
The medial prefrontal cortex of the 156 mg/kg Allium sativum group showed hypertrophy and hyperplasia especially in the cortical plate.
These findings suggest that damage to and neural deficiencies in the prefrontal cortex limits normal emotional display and may precipitate abnormalities in social behaviors that are exhibited by psychopathic individuals (Damasio, 1994).
Since LHX6 promotes the growth of these nerve cells, LHX6 deficits in prefrontal cortex are believed to stall nerve cell functions, affecting the cognitive capacity of some schizophrenia patients, according to the study.
Given the high energy cost of running the prefrontal cortex, the brain prefers to run off its hard drive, known as the basal ganglia, which has a much larger storage capacity and sips, not gulps, fuel.
In the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex, a region associated with an individual's sense of self and self-reflection, soldiers with PTSD exhibited significantly higher brain activity (P less than .
The researchers found that the gene is turned on at increasingly high rates during normal development of the prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain involved in higher functions like thinking and decision-making — but that this normal increase may not occur in people with schizophrenia.
Recent research on the brain seems to indicate that self-regulation is tied to the development of the prefrontal cortex which is not only important for the development of control over emotions, but also that of focused attention as well as planning and monitoring of cognitive behaviors (Davidson et.
We suggest that the tinnitus in these 2 patients was induced by changes in brain activity resulting from transcranial magnetic stimulation of the prefrontal cortex.
Another biological factor affecting the determination of Major Depressive Disorder centered on the prefrontal cortex in the brain.