prehistory

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prehistory,

period of human evolution before writing was invented and records kept. The term was coined by Daniel Wilson in 1851. It is followed by protohistory, the period for which we have some records but must still rely largely on archaeological evidence to provide a coherent account. The study of prehistory is concerned with the activities of a society or culture, not of the individual, and is limited to the material evidence that has survived.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to GillreathBrown, there was not any evidence that prehistoric people knew tattoos before the discovery of this tool.
"Tattooing by prehistoric people in the Southwest is not talked about much because there has not ever been any direct evidence to substantiate it.
"The difficulty for us is not seeing things through the eyes of prehistoric people," says Kate.
Most probably, this site was the worship place of the prehistoric people for harvesting whales and other sea and land animals.
If so, you recreated something prehistoric people painted over 30,000 years ago.
"I wanted to bring this idea of prehistoric people and living in caves, when we were hunters and primitive farmers," he says.
An 11,000-year-old quarry where prehistoric people sourced the flint for their arrows and spearheads, as well as limestone, was identified between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.
But now, seven thousand years later, the gods of this prehistoric people are making a surprising comeback in--of all places--Iceland.
Only this particular landscape is under the North Sea and was home to prehistoric people when Britain was a range of hills attached to the European mainland.
Kaul is convinced that Boeslunde was a special sacred place in the Bronze Age where prehistoric people performed their rituals and offered gold to the higher powers.
Prehistoric people are known to have lived in and around the area.
Crucially, the research, published in PLOS ONE and led by the Universitat AutEaAnoma de Barcelona and the University of York, suggests that prehistoric people living in Central Sudan may have understood both the nutritional and medicinal qualities of this and other plants.