senescence

(redirected from Premature aging)
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Related to Premature aging: progeria

senescence

[si′nes·əns]
(biology)
The study of the biological changes related to aging, with special emphasis on plant, animal, and clinical observations which may apply to humans.
(geology)
The part of the erosion cycle at which the stage of old age begins.
References in periodicals archive ?
This altered gene expression may increase the risk of future obesity and premature aging.
By increasing the levels of antioxidants in the skin, Lyc-O-Mato enhances the body's natural defenses against UV induced skin damage, supports healthy skin structure, and helps to prevent premature aging of the skin.
For humans, free radicals contribute to premature aging, the development of degenerative diseases like arthritis and cancer, and cardiovascular problems.
Ji's technique, which involves staining, erasing, washing, and restaining a layered, handmade ground, exploits the chemical interaction of the materials employed to produce a wrinkled, weathered look of premature aging.
Excessive ultraviolet (UV) ray exposure can cause premature aging of the skin, cataracts, skin cancers and immune system suppression.
Research has proved beyond doubt that tobacco causes cancer, heart disease, bronchitis, emphysema and strokes and leads to premature aging.
Because Dolly was created using DNA from a 6-year-old animal, biologists have wondered if she would suffer premature aging or other problems.
The existence of shortened telomeres in infected cells reveal premature aging, Effros said.
A sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 15 is recommended for protection against skin cancer and premature aging of the skin, even on cloudy days when 80 percent of the sun's rays penetrate the clouds.
Airborne contaminants, corrosive pollutants and harsh environmental conditions all contribute to the premature aging of a car's exterior surfaces.
But exercise can help to slow down this premature aging, bringing the aging of type 2 diabetes patients' cardiovascular systems closer to that of people without the disease, said researcher Amy Huebschmann of the University of Colorado School of Medicine.