Preservative

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preservative

[pri′zər·vəd·iv]
(materials)
A chemical added to foodstuffs to prevent oxidation, fermentation, or other deterioration, usually by inhibiting the growth of bacteria.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Preservative

A substance that inhibits decay, infection, or attack by fungi and insects in timber.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

preservative

1. A product, such as creosote, used to make wood waterproof or immune against attack by insects, etc.
2. A protective coating on a metal surface.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amid soaring popularity of preservative blends, governments have put clampdown on the use of some of the preservatives which are believed to be detrimental to human health.
The company says around one-third of its sandwiches still have artificial colors, flavors or preservatives, including Egg McMuffins and Filet-O-Fish.
Food preservatives are added to foods for a variety of reasons, such as extending product shelf-life by preventing growth of undesirable microbes (bacteria, yeast, and mold) and/or preventing rancidity.
It is worth noting that the use of synthetic preservatives at their recommended dose levels did not seem to cause any skin irritation in an analysis of 45,000 human subjects.
Troy evaluates its preservatives at numerous sites in order to gauge aggregate performance, so that coatings manufacturers can be assured of protection across the widest breadth of exposure scenarios.
Some preservatives do no harm, and may actually enhance the nutritional value of the food.
Method 20 is physical protection with preservative (with greaseproof wrap, as required).
Food preservatives labeled "natural" sound healthy, but they're not necessarily better at keeping your cat's food fresh.
and has worked in marketing, technical service, and regulatory affairs in the personal care industry, describes the use of cosmetic preservatives. He examines preservatives in each category and sub-category, with information on specific regulations, chemistry, ingredient review, non-cosmetic approvals and uses, producers, purity and available combinations, solubility, activity, inactivators, methods of incorporation, analyzing finished formulations, and safety ratings.
The use of preservatives containing arsenic, chromium, and other heavy metals has decreased in most European countries and North America (Green and Clausen 2005, Humar et al.