Press, Frank

Press, Frank

(1924–  ) seismologist, governnment science adviser; born in New York City. He held faculty positions at Columbia University (1949–55), the California Institute of Technology (1955–65), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1965–77); he was president of the National Academy of Science from 1981. As director of the California Institute of Technology's seismological laboratory, Press and his colleagues first identified the "free oscillations" of the earth—the persistent global vibrations arising from earthquakes and other geological disturbances. During his service on the International Geophysical Year glaciology and seismology panel (1955–59), he helped determine the thickness of the earth's North American crust, while his polar research confirmed Antarctica to be a true continent. He was a consultant for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the U.S. military, and the State and Defense Departments; a delegate to the Nuclear Test Ban Conference in Geneva; a member of the President's Science Advisory Committee (1961–64); and director of the U.S. Office of Science and Technology Policy (1977–81).
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.
References in periodicals archive ?
press, Frank felt that somebody ought to print them here, and if that somebody had to be us, so be it.
In his book, Investment in Blood, to be published next week by Yale University Press, Frank Ledwidge, estimates British troops in Helmand have killed at least 500 non-combatants.
When introducing the MDX to the national press, Frank Paluch, chief engineer of the '07 MDX (he also served as chief engineer for the Honda Pilot--a vehicle which, like the MDX, is built at Honda of Canada Mfg., although the MDX is shifted to a special inspection area) and his colleagues brought the 300-hp SUVs to the track, brought along competitive vehicles including the BMW X5, Porsche Cayenne, and Volvo XC90, and said, in effect, "Go out and see what they can do." Which is to say that Paluch et.
On February 23, the day before this story was due to go to press, Frank Olsen, CEO and founder of QTN, released this statement to The Advocate, offering no further comment: