Pressure Chamber


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pressure chamber

[′presh·ər ‚chām·bər]
(engineering)
A chamber in which an artificial environment is established at low or high pressures to test equipment under simulated conditions of operation.
(mining engineering)
An enclosed space that seals off a part of a mine and in which the air pressure can be raised or lowered.

Pressure Chamber

 

a hermetically sealed chamber for decreasing pressure (vacuum chamber) or increasing it (compression chamber). The most common pressure chambers are those of decreased pressure, in which the pressure may be changed from that of the earth’s surface to fractions of mm of mercury (1 mm of mercury = 133.322 newtons/m2). The volume of the chamber may range from a fraction of a cubic meter to several hundred cubic meters, depending on its purpose. The pressure chamber is equipped with special apparatus for changing the pressure, for maintaining it at a prescribed level (vacuum pumps with a system of regulation, a mercury manometer, altimeter, and so forth), and for changing or maintaining the composition of the air. Depending on their purpose, some chambers contain devices for changing pressure at definite speeds, making it possible to imitate ascent or descent, and special systems for signaling, control, communication, and so forth. Pressure chambers in which temperature may be changed simultaneously with pressure are called thermal pressure chambers; they are equipped with devices regulating temperature.

Pressure chambers are widely used in research and for calibrating aviation, meteorological, aerological, and other instruments containing elements that measure pressure. They are used for testing airplanes and airplane engines, for training flight crews and cosmonauts, for studying the effects on living organisms of hypoxia, decreased or increased barometric pressure, abrupt changes in pressure, changes in the gaseous atmosphere, and for other purposes. In medicine they are used in the treatment of such diseases as whooping cough, bronchial asthma, and the bends (caisson disease) and in some operations (for example, open heart surgery).

S. N. NEPOMNIASHCHII

References in periodicals archive ?
As a consequence the pressure in the high pressure chamber and the plunger forces are reduced.
A student may be put in a centrifuge and spun up to a few Gs, in a dunker and have to escape from the upside-down canister underwater, or in the low pressure chamber, where altitudes are simulated and oxygen is reduced.
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Key statement: A non-destructive tire testing device has at least one measuring head, a positioning means for moving the measuring head between a park position (I) and a measuring position (II), a pressure chamber in which the test object can be subjected to a prescribed pressure, and a sub-frame on which the test object can be mounted during the test.
In Brief: A prototype pressure chamber and camera system finds very small cracks, called microcracks, in fresh eggshells.
The extinguishing force is calculated for the pressure chamber in the pressure and attraction, friction and possible striking force, i.e.,
Each processing line is a collection of conveyor belts, grinders, shredders, separators, and a large, high-temperature pressure chamber. Conveyor belts feed unsorted residential MSW into the grinders and shredders.
Professor Damian Bailey and other volunteers have been spending up to eight hours in the pressure chamber at the Treforest university in a bid to induce severe headaches to better understand migraine.
The PP300-A Clear-View Pressure Chamber system dispenses cyanoacrylate directly from a jar or bottle without having to transfer the material from the supplier's container.
One possible approach to the problem is inspired by an intriguing observation, first documented 40 years ago, that the effects of general anesthesia can be reversed by putting an anesthetized animal in a pressure chamber and subjecting it to 100 or so atmospheres of pressure.
The process works by placing the corpse into a pressure chamber filled with water and potassium hydroxide that is then pressurised and heated to 180C.
Selina Barbour, 27, fell seriously ill and had to spend almost a week being treated in a pressure chamber.