pressure suit

(redirected from Pressure suits)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

pressure suit

[′presh·ər ‚süt]
(aerospace engineering)
A garment designed to provide pressure upon the body so that respiratory and circulatory functions may continue normally, or nearly so, under low-pressure conditions such as occur at high altitudes or in space without benefit of a pressurized cabin.

Pressure Suit

 

a pilot’s personal equipment for protection against the dangers of low barometric pressure in case of depressurization of the cockpit at altitudes of more than 12-15 km. The pressure suit is a flight suit with an oxygen mask having surplus pressure or with a pressure helmet. It should exert even counterpressure over the entire surface of the body, not hinder the pilot’s movements, and be air- and vapor-tight. The pilot must be able to put it on and take it off without help from others. The maximum flight elevation in the pressure suit depends on the duration of the flight, how well the suit fits, and the physical strain on the pilot. The principle of action of the pressure suit is based on the fact that the surface of the body is subject to mechanical squeezing with specific pressure equal to the pressure of gas in the lungs. This is done by tension devices with pneumatic chambers inside. When they fill with gas, the chambers straighten out, increase in diameter, and stretch the fabric of the suit.

IU. F. ZAV’IALOV

pressure suit

A skintight suit that may or may not enclose the body fully and can exert pressure on the major portion of the body to counteract an increased intrapulmonary oxygen pressure. The suit permits the respiratory and circulatory functions to take place normally, or near normally, under low-pressure conditions. The suit is used for high-altitude flying where there is a possibility of explosive decompression. See also partial pressure suit.
References in periodicals archive ?
"When Joe did his jump, it was with a partial pressure suit. A full pressure suit inflates around you, like you are in a bubble.
There are scientists alive today who look forward to an era when we could convert Mars into a planet capable of allowing people to walk without pressure suits -we could attempt to terra form Mars.
For this reason, pilots likely to encounter very high altitudes wear full-body pressure suits to protect them in case cabin pressure is lost.
My pressure suit is fully inflated, affording me the approximate mobility of someone in a body cast.
It may fall below a safe level, in which case only inflation of your pressure suit stands between you and a niche in Arlington Cemetery.
It was a hot June day as I donned my pressure suit for a local, high-altitude sortie above California.
Having direct sunlight on you while in the pressure suit is like wearing two or three sets of chemical gear and laying out in the sun.
This is the point where a hot, dehydrated pilot in a pressure suit starts making bad decisions.