deflation

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deflation:

see inflationinflation,
in economics, persistent and relatively large increase in the general price level of goods and services. Its opposite is deflation, a process of generally declining prices. The U.S.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

deflation

(ECONOMICS) a decrease over time in the general level of prices, coupled with an overall reduction in the level of economic activity, new investment, etc. (compare INFLATION). In modern capitalist economies, in which inflation tends to be endemic, deflation is usually relative rather than absolute, involving a reduction in rates of price increase rather than an absolute decrease in prices.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Deflation

 

the decrease of monetary volume by means of the withdrawal from circulation of excess paper money. Deflation often precedes monetary reforms. Since World War II deflation has most often been encountered as part of the so-called deflation policy of capitalist states, which aims at stopping or decreasing the rates of growth of monetary volume and commodity prices. Deflation is realized through limitation of credits (an increase in the rate of interest, imposition of credit limits), higher taxes, reduction of expenditures for social and cultural needs, a “freeze” on wages and salaries, and other measures carried out by capitalist states. These measures result in a lowering of the rate of economic development, a deterioration in the living conditions of the toiling masses, and an intensification of the class struggle.


Deflation

 

the disintegration of rocks and soils owing to wind action, accompanied by the removal and wearing away of the broken particles. Deflation is particularly strong in those parts of deserts from which dominant winds blow (for example, in the southern part of the Karakumy desert). The processes of deflation and physical weathering result in the formation of eroded cliffs with unusual shapes, such as towers, columns, and obelisks.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

deflation

[di′flā·shən]
(geology)
The sweeping erosive action of the wind over the ground.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

deflation

1. Economics a reduction in the level of total spending and economic activity resulting in lower levels of output, employment, investment, trade, profits, and prices
2. Geology the removal of loose rock material, sand, and dust by the wind
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Bank of Japan adopted its policy of quantitative easing in March 2001 to convince markets that it would end price deflation and to boost depositors' confidence in the financially distressed banking sector.
The average rate of price deflation between 1929 and 1933 was 6.4 percent.
Weiser further points to reduced popularity of the company's 5-9 piece toddler bedding sets after the warning from the American Academy of Pediatrics about the risks of SIDS from crib bumpers as well as the price deflation from the devaluation of Chinese Yuan.
'On month on month basis October 2018 , all items inflation was highest in Plateau (2.0%), Jigawa (1.97%), and Bauchi (1.67%), with Akwa Ibom Kwara and Ondo recording negative inflation or price deflation (general decrease in the general price level of goods and services or a negative inflation rate) in October 2018'.
"Barratt remains more vulnerable to price deflation than most of its peers because its margins are much lower."
Shop price deflation deepened to 0.8% in February from 0.5% in January, easing the squeeze on consumer incomes, according to the BRCNielsen Shop Price Index.
Results were impacted by food price deflation and calendar shifts, as the food retail group was flat at $7.39 billion and SDM sales edged up 0.3% to $2.77 billion.
Likewise, railcar price deflation slowed to 3.3% following a 4.1% deflation rate in March.
In documents filed at Companies House, Waitrose said it was operating "against a backdrop of exceptionally tough market conditions and continuing food price deflation".
Food price deflation continues to impact our sales and pressures on pricing mean the market will remain competitive for the foreseeable future."
CPI inflation is currently 0.2% The price of oil fell by 2.6% last month, but economists predict it will help drive inflation, as fuel price deflation eases due to heftier falls in January 2015.
but at a pace that is expected to pick up in response to the ongoing reforms." "And one real challenge that looms ahead appears not to be the price inflation but the possible price deflation," chief economic advisor Arvind Subramanian said.