Prichard


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Prichard

(prĭch`ərd), city (1990 pop. 34,311), Mobile co., SW Ala., an industrial suburb of Mobile; settled 1900, inc. 1925. It developed as a vegetable-shipping point due to the local Mobile and Ohio railroad track. Manufacturing now includes rubber, lumber, and paper products.
References in classic literature ?
After three years expectation that things would mend, I accepted an advantageous offer from Captain William Prichard, master of the Antelope, who was making a voyage to the South Sea.
His continued respect for Prichard marks much of the rhetoric in his 1854 speech.
Prichard was derived from an [F.sub.5] plant from the cross Co82-622 x `Howard' (USDA-ARS, 2000).
innings only): 3 S Law, 7-2 N Knight, 9-2 R Irani, D Ostler, 11-2 M Powell, P Prichard.
In February, MINING Magazine ran an article 'The Aguablanca discovery', accredited to Dr Lorena Ortega, Dr Hazel Prichard, et al.
"We're getting people aged 19 to in their 70s," says Lorig spokesman Hugh Prichard. "The project is very attractive to people who have lived in a bigger city and are comfortable with urban living."
Said Tom Prichard, the group's president, "I would think the governor at the very least would give equal recognition to a day of prayer as he gave to Mick Jagger and the Rolling Stones."
At Southwark (by MacCormac Jamieson Prichard) the station is organised around a dramatic half-conical subterranean hall, four storeys high.
"I wondered if there was any platinum on the streets of Cardiff, my hometown," says Hazel Prichard, a British geologist (earth scientist).
A initial study by ENT surgeon Andrew Prichard, who runs the Sleep Disturbance Clinic at the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital, showed that their use could help snorers.
While eighteenth-century debates on the Celts have been the focus of several studies, relatively little attention has been paid to the discussions in the nineteenth century.(3) This paper will trace the development of the Celtic problem as evinced in the writings of the Bristol doctor and ethnologist James Cowles Prichard (1786-1848).