protagonist

(redirected from Primary character)
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protagonist

the principal character in a play, story, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
displacement as well as the structural pattern into which the other Varvaras must try to fit--an initial appearance in which they are called on to protect a primary character, followed by a second appearance with analogous expectations.
The book's primary character is a young boy named Zeke, who is seeking answers about life and is especially curious about prayer--who prays, why do they pray and what kind of results does praying bring?
No news of a movie has emerged since it was announced last October, though Cross confirms that each episode will revolve around one primary character.
Ultimately, the primary character is rewarded for his altruistic actions (Gerould 1908/2000).
We see new French oak as a complement of the vineyard and varietal, not a primary character.
Many of Van Pelt's papers are produced with renowned big-tree climber and scientist Steve Sillet, the primary character in the book The Wild Trees.
All of his films--The Indian Runner (1991), The Crossing Guard (1995), and The Pledge (2001)--revolve around men who deliberately distance themselves from convention, and each features a primary character in extremis.
In a chapter late in the poem (XLV), the lives of the narrator and a primary character.
DR JAMES KILDARE was a fictional character, the primary character in a series of American theatrical films in the late 1930s and early 1940s, an early 1950s radio series, a 1960s television series of the same name and a comic book based on the TV show.
This brings us to the third primary character in the scandal: David Profumo himself.
Telemakos, a youth, is the primary character in this novel.
Case in point: while situating To Kill a Mockingbird within the contextual development of early twentieth-century white supremacy and anti-miscegenation laws, Sundquist insightfully suggests that Lee, in writing the novel, "adopted an evasive posture" concerning the level of pre-Holocaust anti-Semitism in the United States, by marking Atticus Finch--the primary character of her novel--as indifferent to the Ku Klux Klan and its brand of anti-Semitism.