flight feather

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Related to Primary feathers: Flight feathers, tail feathers

flight feather

[′flīt ‚feth·ər]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of the long contour feathers on the wing of a bird. Also known as remex.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second method used to estimate molt duration of primary feathers was that proposed by Rohwer and Wang (2010), using data of molt intensity, length, and growth rate of primary feathers.
According to Rohwer and Wang (2010), assuming no interruption in the molt of primary feathers, the number of days it takes for and adult individual to replace all primary feathers is given by the following expression: d = l / (r y), where d is the number of days, l is the total length of the primary feathers, r is the rate of growth of primary feathers in mm/day, and y is the average number of primary feathers growing simultaneously.
Molt duration of primary feathers for each species was estimated for adults and immature individuals (birds undergoing a pre-formative molt) independently, however it was not possible to discriminate by sex due to a small sample size.
Finally, dynamics of flight feather molt intensity were described according to Rohwer (2008), detailing the number of growing flight feathers, related to the outermost growing primary feather. This allows observing the distribution of the number of flight feathers in simultaneous growth as the molt of primary feathers took place.
The timing of primary feather molt was very similar from year to year (Figure 6).
The distinctive slots between the primary feathers facilitate slower flight, which is especially useful when the raptor takes off while clutching prey in its talons.
Their primary feathers are widely slotted, and each of these feathers can act as a separate wing, contributing to the lift and thrust needed to maneuver around vegetation and other structures at slower speeds.
Extensive primary feather damage interferes with lift and thrust production, especially at the wingtip (Table 1).
Primary feathers 6 and 10 on each wing were plucked, and the cryoprobe was inserted to the level of the follicle.
One of the pigeons had tissue recession distal to feather follicle 6, which resulted in exposure of the proximal feather shafts of primary feathers 5 and 7.
In this study, we evaluated the use of diode laser and cryosurgery as methods of ablating primary feather follicles in domestic pigeons (Columba livia).
Occasionally, primary feather follicles may remain at the surgical site, leading to abnormal feather growth, feather follicle cysts, or ingrown feathers.