cowslip

(redirected from Primula veris)
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cowslip,

name for plants of the borageborage
, common name for the Boraginaceae, a family of widely distributed herbs and some tropical shrubs or trees characterized by rough or hairy stems, four-part fruits, and usually fragrant blossoms.
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, marsh marigoldmarsh marigold,
perennial spring-blooming Old World and North American plant (Caltha palustris) of the family Ranunculaceae (buttercup family), found in wet places. It has rounded glossy leaves and large buttercuplike flowers of bright and shining yellow.
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, and primroseprimrose,
common name for the genus Primula of the Primulaceae, a family of low perennial herbs with species found on all continents, most frequently in north temperate regions.
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 families.
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marsh marigold

marsh marigold

WARNING (note- there is another plant also called cowslip) Yellow buttercup-like flowers with hollow stem that grows near water. This plant can blister skin, but if used correctly, has been used for coughs and snakebite. Laxative and diuretic. TOXIC unless boiled in multiple changes of water. Be careful. Survival food if boiled. There is another plant called Marsh Marigold (Caltha leptosepala)

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primrose

primrose

Colorful, edible flower with sweet, bland taste. Note there is another plant also called Cowslip (Marsh Marigold) which isn’t the same.

cowslip

symbol of beauty. [Flower Symbolism: Jobes, 377]
See: Beauty

cowslip

1. a primrose, Primula veris, native to temperate regions of the Old World, having fragrant yellow flowers
2. US and Canadian another name for marsh marigold
References in periodicals archive ?
In Experiment 2 we used a two-way factorial design to study the effects of leaf removal and manipulation of reproduction on Primula veris (all treatments in [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED]).
We tested whether seed set of Primula veris is limited by pollen availability and whether reproduction results in costs to future reproduction, growth, and survival.
Thus it seems probable that resources for growth, reproduction, and storage in Primula veris do not come from the same fixed, common pool.
The response of Primula veris to pollination may be caused simply by the physiological characteristics of plant reproduction.