spooling

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Related to Print spooling: print spooler, Printer spooling

spooling

[′spül·iŋ]
(computer science)
The temporary storage of input and output on high-speed input-output devices, typically magnetic disks and drums, in order to increase throughput. Acronym for simultaneous peripheral operations on line.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

spooling

(Simultaneous Peripheral Operations OnLine) The overlapping of low-speed operations with normal processing. Spooling originated with mainframes in order to optimize slow operations such as reading cards and printing. Card input was read onto disk and printer output was stored on disk. In that way, the business data processing was performed at high speed, receiving input from disk and sending output to disk. Subsequently, spooling is used to buffer data for the printer as well as remote batch terminals. See print spooler.
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References in periodicals archive ?
* Print spooling softwareTo keep the user working on other projects while he waits for a document to print, buy him a print spooler, which stores the output on disk and lets the user manage the print queue, instead of the queue managing the user.
And print spooling saves time by allowing users to continue to work.
Print spooling allows rapid data transmission to the store and subsequent slow-speed printing at each store without tying up communications facilities or the host processor.