sheet music

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sheet music

1. the printed or written copy of a short composition or piece, esp in the form of unbound leaves
2. music in its written or printed form
References in periodicals archive ?
Until recently no one had tried to identify the divergences between the different printed scores that came out in the composer's lifetime (e.
Reiner continues to be one of my favorite conductors because like Klemperer, Toscanini, and others, he wasn't afraid to be himself, to let his own vision of a composer's work permeate the music, all the while maintaining a strict adherence to the printed score.
Common sense tells us that the authority for the score accrues in the progression of revision leading to the first published version, most of all in the first printed score if it benefited from the opportunity of correction by the composer.
More successful, because more suited to the printed score, is the chapter on rubato where the author has evolved effective diagrams using poetic stress marks, forward and backward arrows to show accelerandos and the reverse, and combining on one score the markings of several performers.
1 format can now include full information about how notes, symbols, measures, staves, systems, credits, and pages appear in a printed score.
The combination of a printed score and the new digital adjunct constituted a "hybrid critical edition.
Although the verse was included in the original printed score, some time later when Berlin played the song to friends he noted their distaste for the opening lines.
Wit and his Polish forces demonstrate once again (as they did in their recordings of Penderecki) that they are capable of precise musicianship in the face of what must be a daunting printed score.
Lully's instructions in the printed score read, |the second dance air and the chorus that follows are done again to finish [the divertissement and the act].
I recommend that teachers obtain audio recordings and printed score (if the student is able to follow a score) of the composition to hear the original work performed by organ or orchestra.
With the aid of a "Sibelius" computer programe this was eventually transformed into a printed score, but not before Sir Edward had laboriously checked through it for mistakes, comparing the manuscript to vocal scores.
For better or worse, the history of musical theater has been written chiefly from the standpoint of the composer, an approach that acknowledges both the primacy of the printed score and the power of music to enhance a story.