Pristiophoridae


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Pristiophoridae

[‚pris·tē·ə′fȯr·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The saw sharks, a family of modern sharks often grouped with the squaloids which have a greatly extended rostrum with enlarged denticles along the margins.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pristiophoridae

 

(saw sharks), a family of fishes. The ensiform snout, which has sharp teeth along both sides, resembles a two-sided saw. Unlike sawfish of the genus Pristis, saw sharks have a pair of long cirra and lateral gill openings. They reach a length of 1.5 m and are viviparous. There are two genera, embracing four species. Saw sharks are distributed in the warm western waters of the Pacific and Indian oceans. They feed “on small fish and on invertebrates, which they dig out from the bottom with their snout. Saw sharks have some commercial value.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The families Hexanchidae, Chlamydoselachidae, Heterodontidae, Pristiophoridae and Squatinidae.