globalization

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globalization

Operating around the world. Although many large companies have globalized for decades, the Web, more than any other phenomenon, has enabled the smallest company to have a global presence. See localization.

globalization

A mulifaceted process in which the world is becoming more and more interconnected and communication is becoming instanteneous. Aspects of this process include:
  1. the transformation of the spatial arrangement and organization of social relations involving ‘action at a distance’, a stretching of social relations and transactions (and power), including instantaneous communications across time-space;
  2. the increasing extensity, intensity, velocity and impact of global social relations and transactions (see Held et al. 1999);
  3. the creation of new networks and nodes – the ‘network society’ (CASTELLS) – associated with the new levels of dependence on knowledge/ information and ‘expert systems – the ‘information’ or ‘knowledge society’ – as well as the new risks associated with this – RISK SOCIETY;
  4. a dialect between the global and the local in which (consistent with a dialect of power and the duality of structure) the outcome is not a simple triumph of the centre over the periphery, mere Americanization’, or suchlike (see also MCDONALDIZATION).

As Held et al. (1999) suggest, a ‘vibrant’ ongoing debate exists on the characterization of globalization between three groups of theorists:

  1. ‘hyperglobalizers’ (e.g. Ohmae 1990; 1995) for whom global marketization is the main driver;
  2. 'S ceptics’ (notably Hirst and Thompson 1996a and b), who play down the level and distinctiveness of the change;
  3. ‘transformationalists’, including GIDDENS, for whom globalization is a distinctive new phase such that societies and states across the globe are experiencing profound social as well as economic changes – a ‘massive shake-out’ of social relations, economies, governance and politics – as they seek to adapt to an increasingly interconnected but also unpredictable and uncertain world.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mediation: Various organizations or groups active as watchdogs on globalization have identified their own priorities, and assume different positions in this regard, so that they cannot be distinguished as pro-globalization or anti-globalization.
Acknowledging this empirical uncertainty and drawing careful and cautious conclusions is the only way to proceed, but this is not the route that some pro-globalization economists, such as Sala-i-Martin and those who rely exclusively on his findings, seem willing to take.
That is consistent with a recurring pattern: pro-globalization forces are unhappy to see the globalizing of solidarity for labor rights, economic justice, the environment, and alternatives to war.
They fault Arroyo for pro-globalization and industrial deregulation and liberalization policies.
The BJP has implemented a right-wing pro-globalization economic agenda that has further impoverished the people.
If anything, a large segment of the movement is pro-globalization, but it is an alternative globalization movement--one that seeks to eliminate the outrageous inequalities between rich and poor and between the powerful and the powerless, convinced that a better future of self-determination is possible for the world's poor.
Markusen often attempts to present the pro-globalization case in anti-globalization conferences, after which he enjoys a hard bike ride in the mountains, followed by research into local micro brews.
Second, the continuing appeal of Pauline Hanson's One Nation has shocked the revolutionary movement into attempting to coalesce an electoral alliance that can appeal, on a socialist basis, to those dissatisfied with the impact of economic rationalism and the pro-globalization policies of both major parties.
Naiman's act helped set the stage for the first really big post-Seattle confrontation between pro-globalization and anti-globalization forces: the spring meeting of the IMF and the World Bank in Washington, D.
Rather, most of the confrontations have been rearguard-type actions challenging the neoliberal and pro-globalization policies implemented by successive governments since 1984.