probation

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probation,

method by which the punishment of a convicted offender is conditionally suspended. The offender must remain in the community and under the supervision of a probation officer, who is usually a court-appointed official. In theory, probation is not a form of leniency but is intended for offenders whose rehabilitation can be better achieved by community care than by imprisonment. However, the offender's original sentence remains in force and can be invoked should he violate the provisions of the probation. Probation differs from paroleparole
, in criminal law, release from prison of a convict before the expiration of his term on condition that his activities be restricted and that he report regularly to an officer.
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 in that the latter requires the offender to have served a portion of his sentence in an institution. The first law in the United States that established the essentials of a modern probation system was enacted in Massachusetts in 1878; in 2010 some 4 million people were on probation in the United States.

probation

1. a system of dealing with offenders by placing them under the supervision of a probation officer
2. on probation
a. under the supervision of a probation officer
b. undergoing a test period
References in periodicals archive ?
Probationary periods are nothing new and remain fairly standard practice for many public sector employers.
Probationary periods can be especially beneficial for startups or small businesses, which have fewer resources to compensate for a bad hiring decision.
Fluet (1992) applies the concept of a probationary period in a competitive insurance market with asymmetric information and firms exhibiting a Nash behavior.
Fluet's (1992) finding suggests a certain kind of inferiority of the probationary period as a screening device when compared with the monetary deductible.
It also covers the FTO program, so mentors understand exactly what the department expects recruits to accomplish during their probationary periods, as well as how they should handle their proteges?
The average yearly retention rate from 1992 to 1997 stood at 82 percent, then rose in 1998 to 86 percent, a notable figure given the high numbers of new hires, especially women and minorities, who typically find it most difficult to complete their probationary periods.