induction problem

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induction problem

[in′dək·shən ‚präb·ləm]
(electromagnetism)
An effect of potentials and currents induced in conductors of a telephone system by paralleling power facilities or power lines.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The necessitarian solution to the problem of induction involves two claims: first, that necessary connections are justified by an inference to the best explanation; second, that the best theory of necessary connections entails the timeless uniformity of nature.
According to the physical formulation, the problem of induction heating of a metal consists of electromagnetic and thermal problems with strong mutual relations [1, 2, 5, 9].
He contends that a new conception of science should enable the improvement of problematic assumptions about the universe in the persistent rejection of empirically successful disunified theories, which he calls oaim-oriented empiricism,o which replaces standard empiricism and allows for the solution of the problem of induction and stresses the importance of theories to be unified, and he shows the broader implications of this perspective for natural science and global problems.
To illuminate the problem of induction motor estimation, more details of this subject are discussed in this section.
Its twelve chapters are: Hume's Analysis of Causal Connection, The Problem of Induction, What is the Principle of Induction?, J.S.
David Hume on the problem of induction is one of several sources Michael Stevenson integrates into the narration of On How Things Behave, 2010, his most recent video work, which prominently includes tracking shots of a seawall in northern Spain that has been decorated by a hermit using paints washed up by the tide.
Here, Popper was addressing the problem of whether one could offer a theory about the character of science--a methodology and implicitly an epistemology--so as to solve the problem of induction. The problem situation that he addressed simply assumed that our concern was to appraise theories on the basis of experience.
Although the problem of induction motor design has been previously analyzed in many papers like (Arkkio, 1987), most authors present either the electromagnetic or the mechanical aspects of the problem.
Arguing against David Hume and contemporary skeptics, he treats wide-ranging topics including Moore's paradox regarding logical self-contradiction, Wittgenstein-influenced views on the meaning of facts, the classic Problem of Induction, and consciousness-less (as in socio- and psychopaths).
Secondly, the desire to sidestep the 'problem of induction' is motivated by the single most widely advocated scientific methodology, falsificationism, which is the approach most commonly espoused by those few economists who do concern themselves with methodological issues--although even among them, it is honoured more in the breach than in the observance [2, 3].