Proctor compaction test


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Proctor compaction test

A test to determine the optimum moisture content of a soil; the soil is compacted according to a specified procedure, and then compacted samples of the soil are weighed.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the cohesionless soil of the rockfill in the study, a high compacted dry density can be achieved under the condition of completely dry or fully saturated in the Proctor compaction test. However, due to the high hydraulic conductivity of the rockfill material, it is very hard for the material to keep high water content in the field compaction.
Moisture-density relationship was determined by means of the standard and modified Proctor compaction test. The tests were performed in accordance with (ASTM D 698-00, method A) and (ASTM D 1557-00, method A) standards, respectively.
Results of Proctor compaction tests of soil mixed with different percentages of L-SF.
The output of the standard Proctor compaction test consists of the dependence of dry density on water content.
The optimum compaction level of bentonite is achieved with a water content of between 20 and 25% according to the Proctor compaction test. Bentonite in its natural state has a water content of approximately 8%, therefore, it is necessary to introduce additional water in order to obtain an ideal sprayed material consistency.
Then in order to obtain the optimum water content of each sample the standard proctor compaction test (ASTM) were performed.
The Proctor compaction test results are shown in Figure 3.
Caption: Figure 3: Proctor compaction test results: (a) cement-treated silt, (b) cement-fly ash-treated silt, and (c) cement-lime-treated silt.
The Proctor compaction test can determine the optimal moisture content (OWC) at which a given soil type becomes the most dense and achieves its maximum dry density.
Some of the more common outdated references to ASTM standards involve soil classification, soil plasticity, Proctor compaction tests and the nuclear density gauge.
Proctor compaction tests determined that the soil in these areas had a relatively high density and would prove difficult or impossible to compact.