raccoon

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Related to Procyon lotor: raccoon, Northern Raccoon

raccoon,

nocturnal New World mammal of the genus Procyon. The common raccoon of North America, Procyon lotor, also called coon, is found from S Canada to South America, except in parts of the Rocky Mts. and in deserts. It has a stocky, heavily furred body, a pointed face, handlike forepaws, and a bushy tail. It is 1 1-2 to 2 1-2 ft (46–76 cm) long, excluding the 8 to 12 in. (20–30 cm) tail, with mixed gray, brown, and black hair, a black face mask, and black rings on the tail. It lives mostly in wooded areas and usually feeds along lakes and streams. A good climber, it often nests in a hollow tree or climbs aloft for refuge. It has a highly omnivorous diet, including nuts, seeds, fruits, eggs, insects, frogs, and crayfish. When water is available it may dip its food before eating; this so-called washing is associated with behaviors used for location and capture of aquatic prey, such as crayfish and frogs. Raccoons do not hibernate but sleep through cold spells in their dens. Their metabolism is normal during these periods and they wake easily. Adult males are usually solitary; females and young live in family groups. Raccoons have proved highly adaptable to civilization and are found even in large cities, where they feed on garbage. They are a minor nuisance in fields and gardens, but are valuable as destroyers of insects; their durable fur is used for coats and trimmings. The crab-eating raccoon, P. cancrivorus, is a semiaquatic, reddish-colored South American species. Other species are found on Caribbean islands. The raccoon family also includes the New World coatimundicoatimundi
or coati
, omnivore of North and South America related to the raccoon. The coatimundi has a long snout, an elongated body, and a long bushy tail banded with dark rings. The coat color varies from yellowish brown or reddish brown to black.
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, cacomistlecacomistle
, small New World mammal, genus Bassaricus, related to the raccoon. There are two species, one found in Mexico and the SW United States, the other in Central America. The North American cacomistle, B.
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 (ring-tailed cat), and kinkajoukinkajou
, nocturnal, arboreal mammal, Potos flavus, found from Mexico to Brazil and related to the raccoon. It has a long, slender body with soft, short, woolly hair of any of various shades of brown or yellow.
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. Raccoons are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Carnivora, family Procyonidae.

raccoon

[ra′kün]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of 16 species of carnivorous nocturnal mammals belonging to the family Procyonidae; all are arboreal or semiarboreal and have a bushy, long ringed tail.

raccoon

, racoon
1. any omnivorous mammal of the genus Procyon, esp P. lotor (North American raccoon), inhabiting forests of North and Central America and the Caribbean: family Procyonidae, order Carnivora (carnivores). Raccoons have a pointed muzzle, long tail, and greyish-black fur with black bands around the tail and across the face
2. the fur of the North American raccoon
References in periodicals archive ?
Las especies mas abundantes de acuerdo con el IAR fueron Procyon lotor (IAR = 4.35), seguida de Nasua narica (IAR = 3.91).
Effects of landscape composition and structure on core use areas of raccoons (Procyon lotor) in a prairie landscape.--Am.
Biology of the raccoon (Procyon lotor varius Nelson and Goldman) in Alabama.
% Volume % Frequency Mammals Syluilagus palustris 25.1 42.0 Sigmodus hispidus 17.8 40.0 Sus scrofa 11.8 22.0 Sciurus carolinensis 9.3 20.0 Odocoileus virginianus 4.9 6.0 Procyon lotor 3.8 8.0 Peromyscus gossypinus 3.3 30.0 Dasypus novemcinctus 2.7 6.0 Oryzomys palustris 1.3 8.0 Blarina carolinensis 0.1 2.0 Unidentified rodent 0.1 6.0 Unidentified mammal 1.6 6.0 Subtotal 81.8 Birds 13.8 42.0 Vegetation Grass 0.9 26.0 Misc., vegetation 3.3 62.0 Ilex seeds 0.0 6.0 Melamplus 0.0 2.0 Subtotal 4.2 Insect 0.2 8.0 TOTAL 100.0 Coyotes (n = 105 scats) Table II.
The animal's Latin name is Procyon lotor, and they can live to more than 20 years in captivity.
Key words: Didelphis virginiana, Procyon lotor, Mephitis mephitis, Dermacentor variabilis, Didelphilichus serrifer, Pulex simulans, Euhoplopsyllus glacialis affins, Neotrichodectes mephiditis, ectoparasites, Nebraska
HU 4 OMN Dasypus PI, HU 3 INS novemcinctus Tamandua mexicana OD, RO 2 INS Sciurus aureogaster OD 11 HER Sciurus deppei OD 2 FRU Cuniculus paca HU, CR 8 FRU Puma concolor HU,CR 2 CAR Panthera onca CR, HU, EX 4 CAR Urocyon HU 11 OMN cinereoargenteus Mustela frenata HU 1 CAR Potos flavus CAU 1 FRU Bassariscus astutus PI 1 OMN Nasua narica HU, OD, PI 7 OMN Procyon lotor HU, EX 4 OMN Pecari tajacu HU, RO 3 HER Mazama americana CR, HU, PI 3 HER Odocoileus RO 1 HER virginianus Sylvilagus sp.
Gastrointestinal helminths of the raccoon, Procyon lotor, in southern Illinois.
We documented the widespread presence of coyotes (Canis latrans), striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), and raccoons (Procyon lotor), and the localized presence of bobcats (Lynx rufus), gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana).
The common (or northern) raccoon (Procyon lotor: washer dog) is native to North and South America and ranges from southern Canada to northern Argentina.
We developed two types of snares incorporating barbed wire for obtaining hair samples from raccoons (Procyon lotor) suitable for DNA analyses.