proem

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proem

an introduction or preface, such as to a work of literature
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The first chapter of this book examines the instructions, admonitions, and aspirations that are found in the proems of the Mahavamsa and Dipavamsa.
In the proem to a subsequent book of Imagines, penned by Philostratus the Elder's purported grandson (known today as Philostratus the Younger), the earlier work is explicitly defined as a "certain ekphrasis of works of painting" ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]); (14) likewise, a much later Byzantine commentary specifically adduced Philostratus the Elder's text as an example of the rhetorical trope.
The interplay between the seen and the unseen is a topic Spenser addresses throughout The Faerie Queene, and he comments directly on it in the proem to Book 2.
* Construction waste management plan: Having a plan puts the team in a great position to emphasize recycling, reuse and the reduction of construction waste throughout the construction proems.
BEIJING A stirring dose of ancient Chinese passion lies in store for American auds, as composer-conductor Xiao Bai proems the first Western-style interpretation of the classic Chinese opera "Farewell My Concubine" in San Francisco, kicking off its U.S.
Conceivably, the addition of preliminary identifying titles may have been seen as unnecessary or at least immaterial to works that introduce or name themselves in proems, prologues, invocations, and/or other forms of opening device.
The many comparative illustrations from Castiglione's different versions of his text refer predominantly to the proems of the printed edition, treated as their benchmark.
However, the student is not well served with regard to the question of what Lysias accomplishes in this section of his speech, and of how the proems of other speeches can be approached with a view to reconstruct the position into which these texts try to coerce their hearers.
The issue begins on a promising note with Corey Coates's investigation of "paratextual" materials ("epigraphs or epilogues, mottoes or glosses, proems or prologues, choruses, prefaces, and arguments"), in particular the complex, and sometimes conflicting, nature of spousal acknowledgements written by male authors.
Throughout these two volumes we find discussions of individual scenes, and major speeches of the main characters, as well as individual similes and inset tales providing interpretations of Odysseus's scar, Hektor and Andromache's meeting in Book 6 of the Iliad, the meaning of the proems of both epics, Zeus's important speech at the opening of the Odyssey, and Achilles's shield.
The translation itself adopts a slightly `poetical' idiom, which makes for a less lively read than Esolen's version, and is generally more successful at conveying the solemn tone of passages such as the hymnic proems than the more satirical mood of -- say -- the finale to Book 4.