palsy

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palsy:

see paralysisparalysis
or palsy
, complete loss or impairment of the ability to use voluntary muscles, usually as the result of a disorder of the nervous system. The nervous tissue that is injured may be in the brain, the spinal cord, or in the muscles themselves.
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palsy

[′pȯl·zē]
(medicine)
Any of various special types of paralysis, such as cerebral palsy.

palsy

Pathol
paralysis, esp of a specified type
References in periodicals archive ?
Lumping and splitting the Parkinson plus syndromes: Dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and cortical-basal ganglionic degeneration.
1986) measured "Parkinson plus syndrome," which was defined as Parkinson disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA), or PD and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP).
Today, Parkinson-plus diseases are multiple system atrophy (MSA), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP; Quinn, 1989).
Progressive Supranuclear Palsy is a rare degenerative brain disorder which is relate to Parkinson's disease and strikes middle aged and elderly adults.
Moore, who died aged 66 at his home in New Jersey, had been suffering progressive supranuclear palsy for a number of years.
The star, who was 66, had been suffering from a rare degenerative brain disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, for a number of years.
The four-times married star is bitter about his condition, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy - a rare disorder related to Parkinson's disease.
It's progressive supranuclear palsy, a Parkinson's-related malady that attacks the brain and eventually leads to paralysis.
These conditions, called atypical Parkinson's and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), can mimic the muscle rigidity, tremors, slowness of movement, and poor balance of classical Parkinson's.
A key subset of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson's disease showed improvements in motor functioning when treated with the Company's proprietary high-dose formulation of Zolpidem.
Verna Gill has watched on as her father Bob Burke has battled with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) since 2011, which has left him unable to walk and struggling to speak.

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