projective test

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projective test

[prə′jek·tiv ′test]
(psychology)
Observation of a subject's responses to various test materials presented in a relatively unstructured, yet standard situation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

projective test

an indirect test of personality in which individuals are assumed to reveal their personality traits by ‘projecting’ (see DEFENCE MECHANISM) them onto the deliberately ambiguous stimuli responded to. Examples include the RORSCHACH INKBLOT TEST (Rorschach, 1921) and the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) (Murray, 1943).
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
The hedonic risk in advertising theme has been captured through projective technique. Images of activities involving adventure, challenge, and inner satisfaction were shown and the respondents were asked to name one non-cola brand that they associate with the shown images.
Skinner and the Auditory Inkblot: the rise and fall of the Verbal Summator as a projective technique. Hist Psychol.
The most difficult part of research using projective techniques is analyzing data.
Whereas traditional counseling depends on a client's verbalization of his or her experiences, projective techniques limit the dependence on verbalizations to describe abstract emotions or unconscious views.
Second, we use projective techniques as an input to psychological analysis of what is driving the brand equity.
Projective techniques and dream work are interventions that allow release of thoughts and feelings in verbal and nonverbal ways.
These projective techniques are especially effective in enhancing the intensity of one's experience if the person first utilizes preliminary awareness continuum work.
Projective techniques have been a common tool used in consumer research over recent years.
Of these studies, none have attempted to use projective techniques to predict work-stress burnout.
When we make use of other and more indirect measures of brand associations, such as visual and projective techniques (to be described below), we increase the probability of detecting hidden associations, but at the same time increase the risk of evoking irrelevant associations.
The premise of this book is not new, since Freud identified projective techniques as "a process of ascribing one's own drives, feelings and sentiments to other people or to the outside world" in 1896.