projective test

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Related to Projective tests: Thematic Apperception Test, Objective Tests

projective test

[prə′jek·tiv ′test]
(psychology)
Observation of a subject's responses to various test materials presented in a relatively unstructured, yet standard situation.

projective test

an indirect test of personality in which individuals are assumed to reveal their personality traits by ‘projecting’ (see DEFENCE MECHANISM) them onto the deliberately ambiguous stimuli responded to. Examples include the RORSCHACH INKBLOT TEST (Rorschach, 1921) and the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) (Murray, 1943).
References in periodicals archive ?
The 11 reactions were investigated in a previous study, based on an analysis of the content of answers to the projective test. The analysis resulted in a sample of oral responses representative of these actions.
To design the TRFO, eight answer books were assembled and named "Cadernos de TRFO" (TRFO Notebooks), based on the 31 situations proposed in the TBRFP projective test. Each answer book comprised three to four test situations.
We identified a gap in the research regarding the influence of personality characteristics on performance in instruments beyond projective tests. The present study aimed to analyse the distortions of perception on a cognitive ability test through correlation with personality instruments as well as other cognitive abilities.
They boasted that they were independent, had, in fact, "become independent quite early," even as images of dependency longings dominated their childhood memories and their projective tests. Frequently, however, their defense could be seen to collapse, and their behavior to become increasingly regressed.
As far as challenges related to test selection, the use of objective testing is easier to defend than the use of projective tests. There are volumes of research on the validity and reliability of the commonly used objective tests, such as the MMPI and MCMI tests.[18] In addition, objective scoring and interpretive criteria can be easily shown.
If projective tests were used in your case, ask the psychologist to provide you with research that shows the validity and reliability of these tests and the research on their use in custody cases.
As an effect of the criticism against the use of projective tests, a few objective tests have been developed.
The arguments for using questionnaires instead of projective tests seem to be weak.
* describing the specific types of assessment tools used to differentiate among the project's participants, focusing particular attention on the "Projective Test of Work Ethic" and the "In-Basket Test";
Hand Test is a projective test which has been used in west in several studies to assess various aspects of personality and behaviour.
Most projective tests are individually administered and, moreover, protocol scoring, interpretation, and assessment report integration can be rather time-consuming for the clinician.
And it's tempting, then, to assume that writing works as what psychologists call a projective test, which analyses responses to ambiguous stimuli; the Rorschach inkblot test being the most well known.