propagation delay

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propagation delay

[‚präp·ə′gā·shən di‚lā]
(electronics)
The time required for a signal to pass through a given complete operating circuit; it is generally of the order of nanoseconds, and is of extreme importance in computer circuits.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

propagation delay

The time it takes to transmit a signal from one place to another. Propagation delay is dependent solely on distance and two thirds the speed of light. Signals going through a wire or fiber generally travel at two thirds the speed of light. Contrast with nodal processing delay.
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References in periodicals archive ?
KEY SPECS: Suitable for industrial applications, the sensors feature technology that can eliminate the measurement error attibutable to propogation delay.
500 mA to 2,500 ** 30 ps of deterministic mA jitter ** [V.sub.IN] max.: 20V ** Propogation delay times: ** Current limit blanking 500 ps.
Propogation delay is typically 140 ps, with rise times of 50 ps and fall times of 45 ps.
In addition to providing RF performance data such as insertion loss, isolation and VSWR, the company has expanded its relay characterization to include pulse rise time and propogation delay time.
The company has also expanded its relay characterization to include pulse rise time and propogation delay time.