proscenium

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Related to Proscenium theatre: Arena Theatre, Thrust theatre

proscenium

1. the arch or opening separating the stage from the auditorium together with the area immediately in front of the arch
2. (in ancient theatres) the stage itself
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Proscenium

The portion of a theater stage between the drop curtain and the orchestra.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Proscenium

 

the forward part of the stage, the part in front of the proscenium arch and closest to the audience.

In Roman theaters the proscenium was a platform located in front of the stage and used as the acting space (pulpitum). The modern proscenium evolved in 16th-century Italy; for example, the Teatro Olimpico in Vicenza had a proscenium 25.72 m wide and 6 m deep. The proscenium in 16th-century England was separated from the stage by a movable curtain or by columns. A spacious proscenium thrusting deeply into the auditorium was a basic feature of British theaters in the 17th and 18th centuries.

There are permanent prosceniums in the Leningrad Young People’s Theater and the Royal Shakespeare Theatre (Stratford-on-Avon).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

proscenium

1. In the ancient theater, the stage before the scene or back wall.
2. The frame or arch that separates the stage from the seating areas of an auditorium.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was an invisible border between the audience and the actors in Greek and medieval theatre as well; it may indeed have been more flexible and not quite as linear as in proscenium theatres, yet it divided the performers and the observers just as efficiently.
Conversely, in the great majority of productions intended for proscenium theatres the audience's presence is deliberately ignored, and often extra efforts are undertaken to emphasize further the already existing division between the stage and the auditorium.
We soon had entirely black proscenium theatres, thrust theatres and arenas (the Mod, for the record, while dark gray today, was originally painted a warm brown).
The effects of this on proscenium theatre in the years since the '80s can easily be imagined.
In conclusion, even though conditions within Imphal may have improved somewhat and the possibility of regular performances has increased, some of the old problems that assailed Manipuri proscenium theatre in the 1980s have continued to persist.
Similarly evoking an image of the outside world from a Vietnamese perspective was Saigon Village, written by the prolific playwright and actress Nguyen Thi Minh Ngoc, which received a more conservative staging at the proscenium theatre known as IDECAF.
In the proscenium theatre, you are physically prevented from doing that.
The object that most fully engages his curiously is the proscenium theatre's ornate curtain--he tugs at it playfully, drapes himsel in its fringe, tries it on for size like old clothing discovered in the attic.
In proscenium theatres, an arch frames the performance space.
Till today, some of the best surviving proscenium theatres in India are the Tagore Theatres of the '60s; these remain enormously popular with actors and audiences as a preferred and even favoured site of making and experiencing theatre.
Until then I only had experience of proscenium theatres, but it was so obvious to me that the thrust stage was right for the dynamic and human quality of Shakespeare, and it suddenly seemed to me that the proscenium was all wrong.