Prose Edda


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Prose Edda

 

(also Snorri’s Edda, Younger Edda), a work written by the Icelandic prose writer and poet Snorri Sturluson between 1222 and 1225. The Prose Edda is divided into a prologue and three parts. Many of the pagan myths recounted in the work appear in no other source. In one section Snorri explains the significance of the kennings (metaphorical expressions) and heiti (poetic synonyms) used in skaldic poetry and illustrates his explanations with examples from the works of the skalds. The Prose Edda also contains an original narrative poem with a prose commentary in a style reminiscent of a scholastic treatise.

PUBLICATION

In Russian translation:
Mladshaia Edda. Afterward by M. I. Steblin-Kamenskii. Leningrad. 1970. (Contains bibliography.)
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Prose Edda, Snorri says that when the Midgard Serpent was brought before Odin: "he flung the serpent into the deep sea which surrounds the whole world, and it grew so large that it now lies in the middle of the ocean round the earth biting its own tail" (56, cf.
That cat was not what it appeared to be; it was the Midgard Serpent that lies curled around the world and is scarcely long enough head to tail to encircle the earth" (Sturlason, Prose Edda 78).
His dog Garm is named after the ferocious hound of Hel, the Goddess of the Norse Underworld (Sturluson, Prose Edda 88), but, unlike his namesake, Giles's Garm is a complete coward.
The following text is an excerpt from The Prose Edda, written by the Icelandic historian, Snorri Sturlason (1178-1241):
The text of Baldrs draumar (with translation and commentary but no introduction) is given as an appendix to Voluspa; this comes from a fragmentary collection of poems in AM 748 I 4 to, which also contains parts of the Prose Edda.
of Indo-European culture: Snorri Sturluson was a thirteenth century Christian Icelander who wrote the Prose Edda, and I don't know why Russell wants us to know that his "approach to his sources was more objective" (p.
And in Snorri Sturluson's prose Edda, we learn that there are many more Norns in addition to the primary Norns of the Past (Urdr), Present (Verdandi), and Future (Skuld):
1178-1241), well known to Old Norse / Old Icelandic scholars as the author of the Prose Edda, the Heimskringla, and quite possibly the Egill's Saga.