protagonist

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protagonist

the principal character in a play, story, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Produced by Moscow's independent production shingle Central Parternship, "Soar" has a nonlinear structure that prompts a sense of disorientation similar to that its grief-stricken protaganist is suffering.
A New Protaganist for Oregon's Rivers: The Water Resources
The sense of melancholic loss identified in The Age of Innocence's protaganist Newland Archer (Daniel Day-Lewis) is, Nicholls claims, seductive and empowering but also deliberately engineered and created by the melancholic himself.
Tchana's protaganist is a brave child who is not only sure of herself but is a quick thinker.
I told them the protaganist was put to death, step by step.
This is what Grossman attempts to convey, often through the eyes of a first- or third-person child protaganist, in fiction rich in plot construction as well as racy journalism, all based on the timbre of the human voice and the pain of experienced history.
And second, there is a remarkable parallel between Palmer's representation of Vivienne's 'discovery' of her inversion, and the scene in Radclyffe Hall's Well of Loneliness, in which the lesbian protaganist, Stephen Gordon, 'discovers, by reading Krafft-Ebbing's Psychopathia Sexualis ...
In her profoundly ambiguous novel The Age of Innocence, the prospect of cultural relativism looms large, haunting the male protaganist in the guise of a "free" woman who speaks a language he can never quite comprehend.
When it becomes apparent that Auguste is involved and even subverting the CIA sub-plot which it takes our protaganist so long to tune in to, Gillespie's claim to superiority is undermined.
Emanuel Litvinoff's attempt to represent this 'unsayability' in The Lost Europeans anticipates Lacoue-Labarthe's suggestion that in the post-war period the trajectory of European culture was at its clearest in its refusal to acknowledge that the Shoah was a massacre of the Jews.(27) The journey that the novel recounts of the protaganist Martin into post-war Europe shows that, whilst the explicit 'othering' of the Jews is 'officially' unspeakable, it nevertheless continues in ways that are muted, but for all that transformed and powerfully active.(28) Furthermore, the inclination to differentiate the Jew from others is as prevalent in Britain as on the Continent.
Much has changed in foreign reporting since 1939 when Huntley Haverstock, the protaganist of Alfred Hitchcock's "Foreign Correspondent," was advised how to do his new job by a drunken London colleague: "All you do is cable back the government handouts and sign them: Our London Correspondent."