protagonist

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protagonist

the principal character in a play, story, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
These protagonists embark on a process of "excavating history for empowering female models" (p.
The infants detected a violation when the protagonists disobeyed the leader but not when they disobeyed the bully, the study found.
Part of the test, so to speak, is the enormous self-doubt that these protagonists project.
Rohmer and Chabrol point out on page 113 of Hitchcock: The First Forty-Four Films: "Though Hitchcock's protagonists participate simultaneously in guilt and in innocence, it is impossible to discern the exact point at which these two extreme poles are balanced.
Substantiating this analysis is not only an inquiry into Schuyler's satirical essays but a detailed explanation of the protagonist's ambiguous position as trickster and as deviant, and of the central idea of miscegenation that allows multiple interpretations.
Thus far I was coming up short on ways to mirror Bridget's example, and it was still unclear to me how this biography embodied a protagonist for the full dignity of women.
The report's authors took passages from two chick lit novels in which the protagonists have "healthy body weight" but "low self-esteem".
In both novels, the authors' protagonists seem deliberately self-referential: White saw himself as an "artist manque," and Carey's Michael Boone was born in the same year and town as Carey himself.
When under the sway of his father and the Umbrian master Perugino (possibly his teacher), Raphael favored ephemerally graceful protagonists in broad landscapes (for instance, the placid Mond Crucifixion, ca.
The strong female protagonists are wonderful and this audio rendition is recommended.
To generate pleasure through rendition of violence and anti-social behavior requires the use of such distancing techniques as obliquity of narration, which turns attention away from the crime and onto the procedures employed by detective protagonists for explaining the means and motives of crime.
Though in very different ways, each one of these books is concerned with the relationship between the form of and the protagonists in early modern English tragedy, primarily Shakespearean tragedy.