proteasome

(redirected from Proteasomes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

proteasome

[′prōd·ē·ə‚sōm]
(biochemistry)
A large proteolytic particle found in the cytoplasm and nucleus of all eukaryotic cells that is the site for degradation of most intracellular proteins.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Kyprolis has been shown to block proteasomes, leading to an excessive build-up of proteins within cells.
Further, studies have shown that prolonged oxidized proteins are more resistant to degradation by 20S proteasomes [66, 67].
in part, to a decline in the ability of proteasomes to degrade oxidatively-modified proteins
The proteasome activity increases considerably during the initial steps of embryonic stem cell differentiation in mice.
mass (kDa)/pl 3217 Proteasome activator complex subunit 3 P61289 29.
Effects of chronic ethanol administration on rat liver proteasome activities: Relationship with oxidative stress.
In the field of cosmetology, a lot of research has been carried out on proteasomes, while the autophagy process remained understudied.
In this scenario, it can be anticipated that a crucial role is played by age-related structural and functional alterations and modifications of proteasomes and immunoproteasomes, the last being a key component of antigen processing and MHC class I antigen presentation.
Proteasomes have two unique enzymological properties as a protease; multiple peptidase activities, and a latent form.
In addition, the a-subunits can bind various proteasome regulators that are needed to built up 26S proteasomes, hybrid proteasomes, and other proteasome-regulator complexes that fulfill a variety of biological functions, such as proteolytic activation and inactivation of regulators of the cell cycle, of transcription, of differentiation, and of metabolic control and removal of proteins, including their processing to MHC class I antigens (1).
Phosphorylation of proteasomes in mammalian cells: identification of two phosphorylated subunits and the effect of phosphorylation on activity.

Full browser ?