Proteinaceous Artificial Fibers

Proteinaceous Artificial Fibers

 

fibers obtained through the chemical treatment of protein of animal or plant origin. Milk protein (casein) is generally used as the raw material for proteinaceous artificial fibers, as are the proteins contained in corn kernels, peanuts, and soybeans. The fibers are formed from alkaline (NaOH) solutions of proteins by the so-called wet method. They are colored with acid, mordant, and other dyes used to dye wool. Proteinaceous artificial fibers have good thermal insulation qualities, are elastic and soft to the touch, do not irritate the skin, and are resistant to the action of weak solutions of mineral acids. They are not resistant to solutions of caustic alkalies. Normal organic solvents do not harm proteinaceous artificial fibers; therefore, articles made from them can be drycleaned. The strength of proteinaceous artificial fibers in comparison with other artificial fibers is not great—the tearing length is 7–10 km, and the loss in strength while wet is 50–70 percent. In connection with this, proteinaceous artificial fibers are usually produced in the form of staple fiber and processed into articles in a mixture with wool or cotton. Proteinaceous artificial fibers are used in the manufacture of cloth for suits, blouses, pajamas, felt, knitted items, hosiery, sports clothes, and blankets.

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