proteoglycan

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Related to Proteoglycans: fibronectin

proteoglycan

[‚prōd·ē·ō′glī·kən]
(biochemistry)
A high-molecular-weight polyanionic substance covalently linked by numerous heteropolysaccharide side chains to a polypeptide chain backbone.
References in periodicals archive ?
At a molecular level, OA is accompanied by the disruptive turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the cartilage; catabolic changes in ECM are mediated not only by the secretion of inflammatory mediators but by the disorganization, fragmentation and eventual loss of collagen fibres and proteoglycans such as aggrecans (a multi-molecular complex of glycoproteins and GAGs).
In osteoarthritis, early proteoglycan loss leads to expansion of the residual proteoglycans and increased cartilage water content, which may appear as increased cartilage thickness on MRI.
Decreased the novo synthesis of glomerular proteoglycans in diabetes: Biochemical and autoradiographic evidences.
Proteoglycans are common constituents present within the developing heart (Handler et al.
Influence of plasma lipid and LDL-subfraction profile on the interaction between low density lipoprotein with human arterial wall proteoglycans.
Up-regulation of a chondroitin sulphate epitope during regeneration of mouse sciatic nerve: evidence that the immunoreactive molecules are related to the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans decorin and versican.
The partial inhibition of SARS-CoV HSR1 by heparin suggests that the envelope proteins coating the SARS-CoV virions might be endowed with positively charged amino acids that could interact with negatively charged sulfate groups present on heparan sulfate proteoglycans expressed on the surface of target cells.
They hypothesized that any long-term effects "could be due to the reported effects of the compound on cartilage metabolism, including stimulation of anabolic activities, such as the synthesis of proteoglycans, and the depression of catabolic activities, such as the effects of metalloproteases.
Proteoglycans are produced by virtually all cell of the human body and play significant roles in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases.
Deficient sulfation of cartilage proteoglycans has been demonstrated in ACG-IB and has been related to a sulfate uptake defect caused by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter gene.
Glucosamine sulfate, usually derived from the shells of shellfish, is thought to promote the production of proteoglycans, spongy water-holding molecules associated with cartilage formation.
And, reports Mandrell, the microbes bound more snugly to a proteoglycans mixture than to a purified sample of one specific proteoglycan, collagen.