Protesilaus

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Protesilaus

(prō'tĕsĭlā`əs), in Greek mythology, Thessalian prince who was killed in the Trojan War. A prophecy foretold that the first man who touched Trojan soil would be the first to die. When the Greek ships arrived at Troy, Protesilaus leaped ashore and was immediately killed. His wife, Laodamia, mourned his death so excessively that the gods allowed his image to visit her for three hours. When he returned to Hades, she was overcome with grief and took her own life.
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CE (I assume a single figure named Philostratus) holds interest for those interested in fictional romance: the Lives of the Sophists (regarding the so-called Second Sophistic), The Life of Apollonius of Tyana, the wonder-worker who travelled throughout Greece, Asia Minor, India and elsewhere, and the Heroicus, the brilliantly bizarre account of a Phoenician merchant meeting a Greek vinedresser, who through contact with his patron, the thrice-born Protesilaos, has remarkable access to the true story of what happened at Troy and its heroes.
It is clear that much of the description of events at the ceremony in the Aithiopika is drawn from Philostratos' account of the cult of Protesilaos in the Troad in his Heroikos (esp.
When the young man arrived at this sanctuary (he sailed directly to Delphi for the trial of strength) he asked Protesilaos how he might overcome his rivals.
It is also interesting to note that a work dealing with the veneration of the Homeric hero Protesilaos would have that cult hero providing a pankratiast with the oracular advice that aided him in developing his signature move.
Scholars of religion, classics, language, and literature look at Protesilaos as the witness of the heroes, strategies for the construction of culture, and Hellenes and foreigners.