Protesilaus


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Protesilaus

(prō'tĕsĭlā`əs), in Greek mythology, Thessalian prince who was killed in the Trojan War. A prophecy foretold that the first man who touched Trojan soil would be the first to die. When the Greek ships arrived at Troy, Protesilaus leaped ashore and was immediately killed. His wife, Laodamia, mourned his death so excessively that the gods allowed his image to visit her for three hours. When he returned to Hades, she was overcome with grief and took her own life.
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Of these brave Protesilaus had been captain while he was yet alive, but he was now lying under the earth.
34-41) And from Phylace two men of exceeding worth sought her to wife, Podarces son of Iphiclus, Phylacus' son, and Actor's noble son, overbearing Protesilaus.
punished for her presumption that Protesilaus should "elude the
plus est quam quod videatur imago;/ adde sonum cerae, Protesilaus erit
Brown & Lamas, 1994, Eurytides serville acritus (Rothschild & Jordan, 1906), Protesilaus molops hetaerius (Rothschild & Jordan, 1906), Protesilaus protesilaus dariensis (Rothschild & Jordan, 1906), Battus polydamas polydamas (Linnaeus, 1758), Parides erithalion erithalion (Boisduval, 1836), Parides eurimedes arriphus (Boisduval, 1836), Parides iphidamas phalias (Rothschild & Jordan, 1906), Heraclides anchisiades idaeus (Fabricius, 1793), Heraclides androgeus epidaurus (Godman & Salvin, 1890), Heraclides astyalus cerc.
Bates, 1864) 9 Protesilaus macrosilaus macrosilaus (Gray, [1853]) 10 Protesilaus 1 2 d macrosilaus penthesilaus (C.
What follows, in Miryam Libran-Moreno's "'A Kind of Orpheus-Legend in Reverse': Two Classical Myths in the Story of Beren and Luthien," is a tour de force analysis of the probable influence of two Classical antecedents on Tolkien: primarily the legend of Orpheus and Eurydice, with the tale of Protesilaus and Laodameia adduced to help explain certain "aberrant and isolated detail[s]" (169).
23) The ancient historian Arrian cites a tradition that Alexanders purpose in sacrificing to Protesilaus was to be luckier than the hero when he landed in Asia (Arr.
In poem 68 Catullus compares the arrival of his candida diva (line 70) at the borrowed house where they may share communes amores (line 69) to the arrival of Laodamia at the house of her new husband, Protesilaus.
Analizo la estructura genital de los machos de tres especies de Protesilaus de Rio Grande du Sul en Brasil, debido a que los caracteres morfologicos externos no proporcionan la informacion suficiente para identificarlas hasta el nivel de especie.
In the second section, the vinedresser describes the actions of Protesilaus in the modern world, chiefly giving oracular responses to those who seek his guidance (including the well-known early third-century pancratiast Helix), and correcting many errors in the Homeric poems.
Notable in this connection is Wilamowitz's suggestion of an echo of Euripides' own Protesilaus in the notion of a statue of the deceased, for the widowed Laodameia in that play kept an image of her deceased husband, the play's title character, in her bedroom: see Dale ad 348-54; for Webster 86, however, the resemblance is the basis for Wilamowitz's dating of the Protesilaus.