protoplanetary disk

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protoplanetary disk

[‚prōd·ō‚plan·ä‚ter·ē ′disk]
(astronomy)
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This collection of dust and gas, known as a protoplanetary disk, is where planets begin to form and contains a whole host of organic molecules.
"It's even more interesting that it was obtained by looking at protoplanetary disks, shedding light on the chemical features of early solar systems, including our own."
Via direct imaging techniques, it has detected a few exoplanets and several companions including brown dwarfs, and revealed the details of many protoplanetary disks and a few debris disks.
Other topics include protoplanetary disks and their evolution, dark matter searches with astroparticle data, comets as building blocks, and cosmological parameters from observations of galaxy clusters.
P.(2003) The thermal regulation of gravitational instabilities in protoplanetary disks. Astrophys.
But faced with a multitude of data indicating that the protoplanetary disks that surround young stars last only a few million years, the scientists have now fine-tuned the model to make Saturn and Jupiter faster.
Astronomers used to think that all protoplanetary disks are shaped basically like Frisbees.
These accretion disks, called protoplanetary disks, are birthing centers for planets and are formed at the same time and with the same material as their parent protostars.
To help answer these and other intriguing questions, a team of astronomers has conducted ALMA's first large-scale, high-resolution survey of protoplanetary disks, the belts of dust and gas around young stars.
Specifically, the team detected 32 stars surrounded by protoplanetary disks. Of these, 12 contain rings and gaps identifiable to newly forming baby planets.
Astronomers also will examine the birthplaces of planets, rotating disks of gas and dust known as protoplanetary disks that surround newly formed stars.
The astronomers used the Very Large Array to image what appear to be 44 protoplanetary disks, reservoirs of dust and gas that feed low-mass newborn stars.