Provintsiia

Provintsiia

 

(“subprovince”), an 18th-century administrative territorial unit in Russia. Some provintsii came into being in 1711 and 1712; provintsii were universally established in 1719. There were about 45 in all. Each gubernia (province) was subdivided into provintsii: the St. Petersburg gubernia into 11, the Moscow into nine, Kiev into four, Riga into two, and so on. Each provintsiia was divided into uezdy (districts) and was headed by a voevoda (military governor) or, in gubernia capitals, by a gubernator (governor), who was assisted by a provincial office. The provintsii were abolished by the Statutes on Gubernii of 1775. There were 66 provintsii at the time of abolishment.

REFERENCE

Got’e, Iu. V. Istoriia oblastnogo upravleniia v Rossii ot Petra I do Ekate-riny II, vols. 1–2, Moscow-Leningrad, 1913–41.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bogoslovskii, Oblastnaia reforma Petra Velikogo: Provintsiia, 1719-27 gg.
Anne, focusing on Russia's supposed provinciality, explains the importance of the provintsiia trope, in which Russia's provincial places are characterized by an ambiguous, mixed-up temporality that reveals Russia itself to be neither "modern" nor straightforwardly "backward.
Casanova's provincial/cosmopolitan opposition seems to recapitulate Russia's stolitsa/ provintsiia binary, but in fact provintsiia in the Russian tradition has a much more complicated and ambiguous resonance than does "la province" in French, or terms like "periphery" in English.
In Russian, provintsiia designates the non-exotic, non-borderland, "native" spaces that are outside of and symbolically opposed to Petersburg and Moscow, all those nameless Gorod N s that literature most often represents as devoid of life and meaning.
The noun provintsiia entered Russian from Polish with Peter the Great's reforms, when it was used to designate a large administrative and territorial unit of the empire.
This vision of provintsiia was to remain strikingly constant from Gogol through Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Sologub and even beyond; a full three decades after Dead Souls, for example, Dostoevsky's Demons presents us with another nameless city, another place characterized by the same overdetermined anonymity signaling the meaninglessness and indistinguishability of all provincial places.
I would contend that Russian literature's frequent focus on provintsiia and provintsial'nost' is related to this understanding: as I said above, the provinces as they are generally represented in Russian literature are not exactly behind the times.
Jahrhundert)/ Lithuania and Ruthenia: Studies of a Transcultural Communication Zone (15th-18th Centuries) (Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2007), 7-33; Volodymyr Masliichuk, Provintsiia na perekhresti kul'tur: Doslidzhennia z istorii Slobids'koi Ukrainy (Kharkiv: Kharkivs'skyi pryvatnyi muzei mis'koi sadyby, 2007); John Czaplicka, ed.
The term provintsiia also seems worthy of use as a category of analysis, while Remnev makes the interesting point that the word "colony" was explicitly avoided in favor of "region" (krai, 403).
Krivonos, "Gogol': Mif provintsial'nogo goroda," in Provintsiia kak real'nost'i ob "ekt osmys" "leniia, ed.
Shcheboleva, Russkaia provintsiia (Moscow: Nash dom, 1997).
in Obshchestvo i vlast[acute]: Rossiiskaia provintsiia, 1917-1980-e gody, 2, ed.