Proxeny


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Proxeny

 

in ancient Greece, a link between city-states, maintained by proxeni. These were citizens rendering hospitality and assistance to envoys or citizens of another city-state, either on their own initiative or on a commission from their own city-state. In exchange, the proxeni enjoyed a number of privileges in that city-state. During the Hellenistic period, the term “proxeny” also denoted the granting of privileges to a foreigner who had rendered special services to a city-state.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The speeches deal with a cross-section of the interests of Athenian society in the fourth century (wills, guardianship, banking, trierarchy, proxeny, slavery, citizenship) but have never been studied in a single book as a group.
He is named several times in Aristotle's will, as one of its chief executors and the intended husband of the philosopher's daughter, Pythais.(3) The late neoplatonic Lives of Aristotle add that Nicanor was the son of the philosopher's benefactor, Proxenus of Atarneus, educated by Aristotle and subsequently adopted as his own son.(4) This late and intrinsically suspect testimony is underpinned by a hellenistic proxeny decree from Ephesus, which honours Nicanor, son of Aristotle, of Stageira.(5) Nicanor, then, was officially styled son of Aristotle and had the philosopher's domicile.