Prudentius


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Prudentius

(Aurelius Clemens Prudentius) (pro͞odĕn`shəs), b. 348, Christian Latin poet, b. Spain. He wrote a number of hymns, occasional Christian lyrics, and poems on saints. Although he held a high place at the Roman court, he eventually retired to devote himself to religion.

Bibliography

See B. M. Peebles, The Poet Prudentius (1951).

Prudentius

Aurelius Clemens . 348--410 ad, Latin Christian poet, born in Spain. His works include the allegory Psychomachia
References in periodicals archive ?
The Depositio Martyrum of the fourth century, the Oxford Dictionary of Saints further says, does not mention Cecilia and neither do the writings of Jerome, Ambrose, Damasus, or Prudentius, all of whom were especially concerned with the martyrs.
Tarumbwa bought Glass Finish as a shelf company from Prudentius Kativhu and Tinashe Kunze in 2009.
The way he uses themes and formulas borrowed from earlier heroic poetry is similar to the way the early Christian Latin poets like Prudentius borrowed from the themes of Roman classical epic in order to write poems on Christian themes.
In the early fifth century the Spanish poet Prudentius visited Rome and described the festivals there in honor of the apostles.
The text by Aurelius Prudentius, a Roman Christian, was written around 400, just after the date when Christmas is first mentioned as a feast.
Reading Sin in the WorM: The Hamartigenia of Prudentius and the Vocation of the Responsible Reader.
Additional patristic editions prepared by Rhenanus include John of Damascus (1507), Nemesius of Emesa and Gregory of Nyssa, with orations by Gregory Nazianzen and the spurious De Differentia Usiae et Hypostasis by pseudo-Basil (1512-1513), some works of Syesius of Cyrene, prepared with Erasmus and printed in Basel four times from 1515 to 1522, Prudentius (1520), the posthumous publication of Erasmus's edition of Origen (1536), and perhaps an edition of John Chrysostom (1540).
Such a connection is especially visible, for example, in the work of Prudentius, the early Christian iconographer, who wrote of the "four and twenty elders .
A more positive spin on the list, called the "Seven Holy Virtues," was developed by Aurelius Clemens Prudentius in his epic poem Psychomachia around 410 AD.
They stem from Plato, Cicero, Virgil, Prudentius, and Aurelius Victor, to Calvin, Rabelais, Desportes, Duplessis-Mornay, and many others.
The Roman self in late antiquity; Prudentius and the poetics of the soul.
And though Gilbert Highet says that Dante "deliberately ignores the late classical writers and the early Christian poets like Prudentius," he also observes that Petrarch (1304-74), Dante's near-contemporary, "knew Claudian well.