Prudentius


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Prudentius

(Aurelius Clemens Prudentius) (pro͞odĕn`shəs), b. 348, Christian Latin poet, b. Spain. He wrote a number of hymns, occasional Christian lyrics, and poems on saints. Although he held a high place at the Roman court, he eventually retired to devote himself to religion.

Bibliography

See B. M. Peebles, The Poet Prudentius (1951).

Prudentius

Aurelius Clemens . 348--410 ad, Latin Christian poet, born in Spain. His works include the allegory Psychomachia
References in periodicals archive ?
Hymn 2 celebrates the martyrdom of Lawrence, and seems to have been written between 401 and 403 after a trip to Rome during which Prudentius took part in the celebration of the feast of St.
Here, Lewis's comments on Prudentius in The Allegory of Love are useful: "It should be noticed that Prudentius' seven champions do not exactly correspond with the familiar list of the seven deadly sins in later writers.
35) The 2 commentaries on poems by Prudentius concern one on the subject of the Nativity and one on the Epiphany.
Speculative Grammar and Stoic Language Theory in Medieval Allegorical Narrative: From Prudentius to Alan of Lille.
In turn, it is not clear why the editor has ruled out the hymns and excerpts of Prudentius, Ambrose, Sedulius, Venantius Fortunatus, which were crucial components of the liturgy in Spain during this period--they would be most helpful for the textual tradition of the poems-, and why following in Blume's footsteps he has continued to give a large number of hymns which have been accepted as non-Hispanic products, such as the Ad cenam agni prouidi (36), Beata nobis gaudia (42), Aurora lucis rutilat (65), In anniversario sacrationis basilicae (189), among many others, which obviously were excluded by Diaz y Diaz from his Index.
The text by Aurelius Prudentius, a Roman Christian, was written around 400, just after the date when Christmas is first mentioned as a feast.
Reading Sin in the WorM: The Hamartigenia of Prudentius and the Vocation of the Responsible Reader.
She found the inspiration for some of this art in the Psychomachia of Prudentius, which itself is connected with several other examples of crusade-inspired art (16).
The author of pseudo-Jerome was actually Prudentius Trecensis, bishop of Troy, d.
Additional patristic editions prepared by Rhenanus include John of Damascus (1507), Nemesius of Emesa and Gregory of Nyssa, with orations by Gregory Nazianzen and the spurious De Differentia Usiae et Hypostasis by pseudo-Basil (1512-1513), some works of Syesius of Cyrene, prepared with Erasmus and printed in Basel four times from 1515 to 1522, Prudentius (1520), the posthumous publication of Erasmus's edition of Origen (1536), and perhaps an edition of John Chrysostom (1540).
Such a connection is especially visible, for example, in the work of Prudentius, the early Christian iconographer, who wrote of the "four and twenty elders .