psalmody

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psalmody

1. the act of singing psalms or hymns
2. the art or practice of the setting to music or singing of psalms
References in periodicals archive ?
5) The concluding sections appear below followed in parentheses by the prophetic, poetic, or psalmodic passage that appears to have inspired them and in many cases provided their vocabulary:
Canlate Domino canticum novum is one of Part's more joyous works and shows an awareness of the balanced textual and musical binarisms of traditional psalmodic practice.
Part sets the text to just one pitch, recited in the balanced phrases of traditional psalmodic practice, and, in so doing, places it at the symbolic center of the collective sound of the strings.
those composed upon pre-existing motets, madrigals and chansons, rather than upon psalmodic formulas from plainsong) remind us how much we yet can learn from Lasso, whose devotion and skill enabled him to embrace and sustain a diverse inheritance.
So Greek epic might have been chanted in a kind of psalmodic delivery responding to a different set of 'rules' from that of the other, more 'arioso' styles.
Ten of the twelve contributors focus on rural practices in England, and the remaining two provide valuable insights into psalmodic traditions transplanted to and transmitted on the Isle of Man (Fenella Bazin) and Australia (James Forsyth).
Such expressions of admiration for monastic psalmody might of themselves constitute evidence for the proposition that monasticism played a role in the rise of the later fourth-century psalmodic movement, but there is a much more tangible form of evidence.
In the hybrid urban Office of the later fourth century, they were combined, at least in some localities, in a unique way by the simple expedient of retaining both and performing them successively, with the monastic psalmodic vigil followed by the cathedral service of praise: this pattern is still recognizable in the Western medieval Matins and Lauds.
The second tangible contribution of monasticism to later fourth-century Christian psalmody was the rise of the popular psalmodic vigil.
But for the sort of vigil that is at issue here--the popular psalmodic vigil--the faithful were required to rise from their beds hours before dawn, to proceed fasting to the church, and generally to celebrate the Eucharist afterwards.