chip rate

(redirected from Pseudorandom noise)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

chip rate

In direct sequence spread spectrum technologies such as DSSS and CDMA, it is the number of bits per second (chips per second) used in the spreading signal. A different spreading signal is added to the data signal to code each transmission uniquely. The number of chips (bits) in the spreading signal is significantly greater than the data bits. Chip rate is measured in "megachips per second" (Mcps), which is millions of chips per second. See spread spectrum, CDMA and 802.11.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Bringing the n bit through the input of the DAC, voltage with uniform PDF (pseudorandom noise - dither) is created at the output.
The GNSS carrier signal transmitted by satellites propagates in the form of electromagnetic wave with binary navigation data and pseudorandom noise (PRN) code modulated on it.
There are various types of spreading sequence that are available, for example, pseudorandom noise (PN) sequences and chaotic sequences.
The QVNS generates an accurate synthetic pseudorandom noise signal with mean-square voltage <[V.sup.2.sub.Q]> = [[absolute value of ([v.sub.JJ])].sup.2]/[K.sup.2.sub.J], where JJ indicates the Josephson junction, [absolute value of ([v.sub.JJ])] is a noise power spectral density that is calculable from QVNS implementation details, and [K.sub.J] is the conventional value for the Josephson constant.
A direct-sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) (Table 1) with a digital spreading function representing pseudorandom noise (PN) chip sequences is employed [5].
Figure 1 shows a configuration of 3 x 3 two-way ranging technique; the navigation signal is modulated by pseudorandom noise (PN) codes.
There are other auxiliary circuits such as a pseudorandom noise (PN) generator and a frequency measurement function.
The time required for the signal to travel from the satellite to the receiver is determined by using a pseudorandom noise (PRN) signal.
The oscillator uses a pseudorandom noise (PRM) technique to spread its energy over a wide frequency band, thereby decreasing peak EMI.
By modulating the data signal with a pseudorandom noise pattern that changes continually according to a defined sequence, each bit of data (or, more correctly, each `symbol') is effectively transmitted at several different frequencies at once.
Chapter 6 discusses the mathematical background of the pseudorandom noise (PN) sequence generators used in IS-95.
Pilot pollution, island cells and rogue pseudorandom noise (PN) are just a few of the problems with which network specialists must deal.