pseudoscientific

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pseudoscientific

Meaning "false knowledge," the term refers to theories that do not follow formal scientific discipline and that cannot be verified. In contrast, a "scientific" fact can be continuously proven with every experiment.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Chapter 4: Science, Protoscience, and Pseudoscience." In Pitt JC, Marcello P.
Here was pseudoscience backed up by religion, proof that "rain follows the plough".
Chemtrails, Climate Science and Clickbait: A Meteorologist Addresses Pseudoscience - 7 p.m.
Controlled Remote Viewing is a psychic pseudoscience that many nations, including the U.S., use to try to create psychic spies who can view details of secret locations.
It will question and challenge the state-of-the-art and try to separate rules-of-thumb and pseudoscience from real science.
The term was first used in 2005 by travel company Sky Travel as part of a marketing campaign, but it has since been labelled as pseudoscience, or completely made-up.
A Christian perspective on science and pseudoscience in clinical practice will also be provided.
(Hoyningen-Huene makes everyday knowledge the principal contrast point rather than pseudoscience, in contrast with many existing discussions of how to distinguish science from nonscience.) For instance, a gardener might have a good deal of everyday knowledge about plants, such that he can provide detailed descriptions of many varieties, make various accurate predictions about plant behavior, be able to debate certain points with other gardeners, and so on.
Thirdly, pseudoscience appeals to holism as opposed to reductionism, especially in alternative medicine (e.g., homeopathy, naturopathy, and mental health) and therefore they resort to the mantra of holism to dismiss negative findings5.
An entertaining, educational, and definitive text on cryptids, "Abominable Science!" presents the arguments both for and against their existence and systematically challenging the pseudoscience that perpetuates their myths.
Her site is chockfull of pseudoscience and innuendo but not too many facts.
CityLimits.org, an investigate news site based in New York City, reported that presentations to students pushed long-debunked pseudoscience about drug use, including claims that body fat can store drugs for years.