psychotropic

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psychotropic

[¦sī·kə¦träp·ik]
(psychology)
Pertaining to any drug or agent having a particular affinity for or effect on the psyche.
References in periodicals archive ?
The research project was designed to determine whether the use of personalized technology for seniors living with dementia can reduce the need to administer as-needed (PRN) psychotropic drugs.
Though the changes have improved the state's health care system for foster children, child welfare advocates say, the rate of foster kids prescribed psychotropic drugs remains high, and accountability gaps regarding prescriptions of the psychiatric medicines persist.
These measures, she said, were being taken to control the increasing misuse of controlled and psychotropic drugs through prescriptions.
In 1997, only about 10 percent of states included psychotropic drugs for the treatment of any mental health condition in their AIDS drug formularies, but by 2008 that number had climbed to 82 percent.
Figures issued by Taiwan's Department of Health indicate that heroin and methamphetamine use has remained relatively unchanged in 2006, but the use of psychotropic drugs like ketamine and MDMA has increased.
The APA also is aiming for technical changes to the new Medicare drug benefit--for instance, making sure mental health patients have appropriate access to psychotropic drugs.
Whatever the rationale, forcing people, particularly children, to take dangerous psychotropic drugs is a totalitarian practice.
However, ADHD patients who never took medication for their conditions were found to have even smaller brains than those who took psychotropic drugs.
Caffeine interacts with a number of psychotropic drugs, and the consequences are potentially serious, Marilyn R.
We identified facilities that scored well on a list of 27 quality indicators, such as minimum use of restraints and psychotropic drugs.
The study will be performed by MPI's Center for Applied GenoTyping (CAGT) with two experimental goals: 1) to identify genetic variations that potentially predispose individuals to specific disorders such as depression and anxiety; and 2) further determine the impact of genetic variants on disease pathogenesis and response to psychotropic drugs.