Ptolemy II


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Ptolemy II

Ptolemy II (Ptolemy Philadelphus) (tŏlˈəmē) (fĭlədĕlˈfəs), c.308–246 B.C., king of ancient Egypt (285–246 B.C.), of the Macedonian dynasty, son of Ptolemy I and Berenice (c.340–281 B.C.). He continued his father's efforts to make Alexandria the cultural center of the Greek world. He completed the Pharos and encouraged the translation of the Pentateuch into the Greek Septuagint. Finances were reformed, and a canal was built from the Nile to the Red Sea. He warred against Syria until he married his daughter Berenice to the Syrian Antiochus II. Ptolemy repudiated his wife Arsinoë to marry his sister, also named Arsinoë. Manetho, the Egyptian historian, compiled his history.

Bibliography

See P. M. Fraser, Ptolemaic Alexandria (3 vol., 1972).

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Ptolemy II

called Philadelphus. 309--246 bc, the son of Ptolemy I; king of Egypt (285--246). Under his rule the power, prosperity, and culture of Egypt was at its height
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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