public house

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Related to Public houses: Pubs

public house

1. Brit the formal name for pub
2. US and Canadian an inn, tavern, or small hotel

inn

1. A place which provides eating and drinking, but no lodging, for the public; a tavern.
2. A hotel.
3. A student hostel or residence.
4. A hospice.
References in periodicals archive ?
We will continue to build more public houses and make sure people move into them, and off the Public Housing Register as quickly possible, Megan Woods said.
These figures do not include the public houses in the surrounding areas of Middlesbrough such as North Ormesby, Cargo Fleet, Acklam and Ormesby.
Of the public houses built between 1830-1899, some have stood the test of time and they are still serving the public to this day.
There are 11 public houses left of the original 92 south of the railway line.
About 63% of public houses which sell food recorded an increase in sales over the last year, compared to a 66% decline in 'wet' led public houses.
"The number of public houses closing weekly has also fallen from 37 to 25.
"The next 12 months are likely to see the market continue to polarise, with public houses which offer food performing much better than their traditional alcohol-only counterparts.
The next two chapters consider the functions of the public house, first outlining the provision of food, drink, and livelihoods for publican families and servants, and then examining their role as "principal facilitators" of early modern communications (115).
The result is an impressive overview that recognizes the early modern public house as the primary site of social exchange and makes a convincing argument for its market-oriented versatility.
Conroy does a wonderful job of explaining why the popularity of public houses eventually drew the suspicions and then the fire of the colonial elite.
Embedded in popular culture, public houses gradually assumed a social and political importance sufficient to counter Puritan and other elite assaults.
Yet Conroy is compelling in his finding that Massachusetts' public houses were a significant part of the social and cultural changes that shaped the Bay Colony as it moved from colonial to independent status and, more significantly, as elite rule adjusted to the rise of a vibrant popular culture.