Publius


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Publius

(pŭb`lēəs), in the New Testament, Paul's host at Malta.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Publius, the debate over ratification was an opportunity "to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever to depend for their political constitutions on accident and force.
Then, just as things looked their bleakest, a brilliant Roman general, Publius Cornelius Scipio, known to historians as Scipio Africanus or Scipio the Great, a man both resolute and clever, stepped to the fore.
As the combined pseudonym of Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay, Publius announces that, with a few exceptions, he has lived up to his early promise of "sedate and candid consideration" (11).
Thus, now, Publius unequivocally declared that Lockean rights to liberty and property must be strongly protected.
Federalist 14, written (under the name Publius, of course) by James
Just as the great Roman historian and orator Publius Tacitus maintained, "The more corrupt the state, the more numerous the laws," the Erdoy-an government will have to push a series of laws through Parliament in order to bring immunities and reduced sentences for himself and others implicated in the corruption.
795, 809 (2005); see also Paul Posner, The Politics of Coercive Federalism in the Bush Era, 37 PUBLIUS 390, 409 (2007) (criticizing "coercive" federalism tools and advocating "marbleized, networked approaches to governance").
In Federalist 46, for example, Publius opined, "[t]he federal and State governments are in fact but different agents and trustees of the people.
We met the long-haired Soothsayer Publius (Joe McKeown) who told amusing stories of old - while passing wind due to a bad stomach.
Carol Weissert is professor Of political science and director of the LeRoy Collins Institute for Public Policy at Florida State University and is the editor of Publius.
A good starting point is Ovidiu's Square, which takes its name from the statue dedicated to the Roman poet, Ovidius Publius Naso, designed by the sculptor Ettore Ferrari in 1887.

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