Pugin


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Pugin

Augustus (Welby Northmore). 1812--52, British architect; a leader of the Gothic Revival. He collaborated with Sir Charles Barry on the Palace of Westminster (begun 1836)
References in periodicals archive ?
Sergei Pugin focused on the fact that now the situation in the oilseed market is favorable: - The increase in the areas sown with oilseeds, both in the country as a whole and in the Kurgan region in particular, suggests that diversification is already underway.
Pugin took his lead from his father, Auguste Charles (1762-1832) a French emigre who worked as a draughtsman and watercolourist.
The parliamentarians' visit follows a presentation given by Nick Corbett from Transforming Cities and Sam Miller from Urban Devotion Birmingham in the Palace of Westminster on the Big Story of Pugin project.
However, regrettably lost for ever is a Pugin Church - St Mary''s Tithebarn Street - opposite where St Patrick is said to have preached his last sermon before going to Ireland.
Steiger and Pugin of CSEM formed J aggregates of cyanines using a mesoporous support with an average pore diameter greater than 1.
Three years later Pugin apprenticed with the venerated French culinary fraternity of Les Compagnon du Tour de France.
However, without Pugin, the dominant figure in the 19th century Gothic Revival movement, it might never have happened.
The early Victorian architect and designer, Augustus Welby Pugin (1812-1852), was what in our day we would call an obsessive and a workaholic.
By the time a furious Abraham Thompson found out that he had been duped, the Hall was sold and the Pugin brothers had a new client.
AUGUSTUS PUGIN (1812-52) lived 'a long life in a short one'.
The lots on sale included works by William Morris, the mid-19th Century designer AWN Pugin, Charles Voysey, William De Morgan and Henry Stacey Marks.